The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

How Client Onboarding Increased Our Retention By 66% Annually

May 11, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins Season 2 Episode 22
How Client Onboarding Increased Our Retention By 66% Annually
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
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The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
How Client Onboarding Increased Our Retention By 66% Annually
May 11, 2023 Season 2 Episode 22
Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins

Having a strong implementation process is essential for long-term client retention, which is why it's important to have a separate department or person in charge. There are many nuances and components to a successful onboarding process, including project management, setting expectations, communication, and more. Get our tips on setting these processes up correctly in this episode.

Thanks for listening!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Having a strong implementation process is essential for long-term client retention, which is why it's important to have a separate department or person in charge. There are many nuances and components to a successful onboarding process, including project management, setting expectations, communication, and more. Get our tips on setting these processes up correctly in this episode.

Thanks for listening!

Unknown:

All these years blood, sweat and tears. I'm still here

Scott Scully:

nothing could stop me. Welcome back to the gross show. I'm here with my partners in crime, Eric Watkins and Jeff winters

Eric Watkins:

to low Hello, welcome back.

Scott Scully:

Feels like a while since we've we've done this, I know hasn't actually been that long. But miss you guys.

Jeff Winters:

Is it hard to get back in the set? Do you feel like you'd slide right back in? Or do you feel like it takes a second?

Scott Scully:

I feel like it takes us a second.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah. I gotta ease back in a little bit.

Scott Scully:

Well, we, we did it again, out on LinkedIn, we stirred it up. didn't worry.

Jeff Winters:

Anybody who's not following Scott Scalia on LinkedIn is missing a comment more, like once every four weeks?

Scott Scully:

Yeah, you're missing the opportunity to see some of LinkedIn worst posts. That's what they say, not yours. Well, I'm labeled the worst, a lot of occasions, but this whole, this whole side hustle thing, you gotta go and check it out. Some people believe in it. Some people don't. It's 5050 When you read the comments, but then in the old direct message category, Oh, lots of people are agreeing with me just not publicly.

Eric Watkins:

Ah, that's interesting. I could see that.

Scott Scully:

Jeff, you were talking a little bit about some of the crime that you have found out on LinkedIn before the show. Got some goodies today, don't you?

Jeff Winters:

I do have some goodies. I think today, as always, I do the work. So you don't have to out there on LinkedIn diving in looking for those who are telling us the truth, in fact, and bringing light where otherwise there is darkness, and those that are telling us. From Jerry Lee, you don't always have to switch jobs to increase your compensation. This is the truth, of course. And then he goes on to talk about his experience at a little company called Google. And how, and I'm paraphrasing. What he did was one day he he decided he wanted to make a certain amount of money in a certain period of time. And I think what a lot of people do is they go elsewhere, or they start interviewing. And what he did instead was he wrote out a plan of what he wanted, he presented it to his manager and said, Hey, this is the compensation. I'm looking for it. This is what I'm willing to do to get it. But I just want you to know that this is what I want. And I want to make sure that it's possible. If I do the work, and I hit the results that I can get there. Not today, not tomorrow, but over a certain period of time. And I thought that was a really good, fresh approach to I want to make more money. I'm not just going to jump on Indeed, I'm going to create a plan and I'm going to make sure it's possible. I like this

Eric Watkins:

truth. Truth. Yeah, I love that

Scott Scully:

it has to be a company where that's available. So I love the fact that he qualified, said this is what I want to make, here's what I want to go is it possible. There are some smaller companies where someone does have to jump to get a pay increase, or maybe to get a different type of position, right. But every time you jump, you have to rebuild equity. And we talk to our folks about that. Like by design, we're trying to have all of these different career paths. So someone could stay underneath one roof, not have to go rebuild equity, and over the course of a five year or a 10 year time period, their their pay and their responsibility is going to be so much higher than if they go to two or three different places where they've kind of got to start over again, each time they go and get involved with a new group of folks.

Jeff Winters:

Also, it's interesting with our exit interviews to like some of these exit interviews, they go on leaving for money and this and that. And it's like that person was about to get promoted, or that person was they don't know this, but we were starting a different division and they could have been a leader in that division. Just because they didn't have that conversation. They didn't no idea it was available.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah. Key is being at a company that has a track record of growth, or significant plans to grow. And then let me know, let me know exhaust all options at your current company where you know the people you have the relationships before you go elsewhere.

Scott Scully:

That is what he's saying though, right? Right. Like you can stay in one spot and be where you want to be. Yeah. You have to call it out. You gotta know.

Eric Watkins:

And if you want to make more money, just get a side hustle.

Scott Scully:

That's the same guy.

Jeff Winters:

We gotta we gotta link Scott's LinkedIn post in the comments on this. I think I think the people are gonna want to look Thank you, Jerry. Now to Matt Higgins. little nuance here. I thought this was good. And I think important. unpopular opinion having a plan B is risky. When you build a plan B to protect yourself from the pain If plan a failing, you're giving yourself the option to fail. Hesitation does not breed greatness to accomplish something great, you have to give yourself no chance to ever turn back. I've gone back and forth on this. I, I know that a plan sometimes has to change in the midst of executing it. But I, I, every time I build a plan B, we do plan B. But I think there's so much to burning the boats. I'm not saying don't do it. I think the way Matt said it was great. Having a plan B that you especially one that you announces risky.

Eric Watkins:

I agree, I think the plan, people put too much weight on the plan, and they should be putting more weight on the execution. And by not having a plan B what it really forces you to do is be perfect with the execution on Plan A. And I love the analogy like the burning the boats, the burning the bridges, letting everybody know, there's no way back. In reality, there's always a way back if you absolutely need it. But I don't think that helps you going into it. I think being very clear on this is where we're going, this is why we're going there. These are all the things we looked at why we're making this change, and this is what we need to do about it.

Scott Scully:

When I hear about Plan B I think of totally different option. And I think what Eric's saying is stay true to the original mission. And maybe as you're executing things adjust along the way. Yeah. But you don't do something like A B testing, right? That's trying to completely different methods out. Sure. So when I hear that, I think, well, if I don't do this, I'm going to do something completely different. Versus I'm going to keep driving it this tweak it along the way, until I figure out how to make it work.

Eric Watkins:

Stubborn on the vision flexible on the details of how you get there.

Jeff Winters:

I think is that another Gandhi quote? Eric,

Eric Watkins:

that's Jeff Bezos, God, are

Jeff Winters:

you good on the Gandhi quotes gotten the Midas said, I think he probably did. And now to lie. The lie, says the hardest part of taking on a player coach role can't be MVP at both. No matter how talented and driven. There's simply not enough time. I used to think this and I think I think this is important because it is an organizational structure question. And the question is, every time I have a leader, somebody who's managing seven 810 12 people leave, do I have to automatically replace that leader with another leader? Or is there another option, and the player coach option is a cool other option that gives people the ability to grow? I've seen it work time and time again. I think this is a lie. And I think they're I think there could be more player coaches out there.

Scott Scully:

I agree. As long as the player coach has a manager. That makes sense, like the manager of the Cardinals could be on the field as well. Right. But I do feel like, which I think probably never happens. That maybe you could have someone that plays third base be a third base coach.

Eric Watkins:

Oh, I like that analogy.

Jeff Winters:

I wasn't thinking sports. But I do like that.

Eric Watkins:

I agree. We've seen it work. It does work. I do think it has a shelf life, though. That would be my one caveat. I do think it's not the Forever solution. Yeah. Because the part that makes it so impactful is those player coaches wanting to move into that manager role? Yeah, that vision is really what pushes it. So I do think it has a shelf life. And it's when that point comes, it's tough. So in your example, the manager leaves, and you out of the 10 individuals, you have three who are head and shoulders above everybody else, so they become the player coaches, then at some point, you're forced to make that decision of who's the best of the three. And that part's tough for people to understand. But if you're transparent throughout, and you have an end date, I think it makes it more impactful.

Jeff Winters:

Here's why I'm passionate about this. I felt like before we were part of abstract that was never crossed my mind as a potential solution. Sure. And so then I was doing one of two things, I was either putting a leader who wasn't ready for that role in that job. Or I was doing it kind of myself, like there was the option to give multiple people a chance, say, hey, instead of doing one leader over 10, we're going to do three leaders over three, and they're going to carry their individual responsibility still, what you'll find is, if it's sales, they can still sell and manage so you don't lose like that productivity there of the salesperson or the account manager or whatever else it is. And then also your create this little competitive environment of theirs, maybe rewrite air to your point, you're gonna have to make a choice, but sometimes you don't know who that great leader is going to be. It's nice to get a little preview.

Eric Watkins:

The other thing is you can actually pay those three people more than you would pay that manager because they're not Not only are they fulfilling a certain duty, you also have a little bit of that manager spend as well. So it's sort of a benefit all the way around. But I do think it has a shelf life. But other than that, it's worked. Sure,

Scott Scully:

sure. And you're saying shelf life for the person, not for the spot. Correct? Yeah. Like you may say, I'm going to have somebody over the sales department, there's going to be three player coaches. And then as we add revenue, I know I'm going to have to have a second person. So somebody moves out of the that group of three someone else comes in. So shelf life for the person, not the actual position of player coach, right? Correct.

Eric Watkins:

Correct. I think that there's got to be, and maybe shelf life is the wrong term. They need a vision with a deadline. Like if you're gonna go into that player coach role vision,

Scott Scully:

and they can't be in competition with the people they're managing.

Eric Watkins:

Correct. But what is it? Yeah, that's yeah, that's a really good point. That's very flawed. Like

Scott Scully:

if it's in sales, and all of a sudden, they're taking the best leads for themselves. And, you know, you set that up in pay.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah. But that's also a great way to show that you're not the right. Lead. By the way, steel, normally a

Jeff Winters:

little bit of foreshadowing by Scott, on salespeople, and how they can make sure they have enough leads. Oh, coming soon.

Eric Watkins:

Oh, come into maybe today,

Scott Scully:

Jeff, again, I'm glad you're out there. We're heading to the 5050. This is an important one. Today, we are going to have a lot of action on this, I think. And today we're going to talk about implementation. New Client implementation, you may call it onboarding, whatever it is that you label it, that is where retention happens, period, companies often don't consider what a new client onboarding process can do to ensure long term results. And to ensure that that client is a is a long term partner for good. You may have account management doing implementations, some of you may have some account managers that are good at that. But I would suggest that depending on your size, I would at least have a person that was in charge of onboarding clients. And at some point, an actual separate department. There's a process that needs to happen. There's project management involved, there's a lot of little nuances and making sure that you bring a client on the right way, set up proper expectations. Let them know what we need out of them, let them know what we're going to be doing the results to expect timelines, communication patterns, there's so much involved, and this can really get screwed up. This is something that we've had to work on a lot because we onboard so many new clients on a monthly basis. You know, from our wonderful sales team, producer Neil mentioned something good before we got on the air today, which which I think is true is, you know, you've got this trust coming into the relationship because that's why the client bought in the first place in the in the original sale. Right? So your salesperson has done a really good job in building trust. And now this is the first look at your organization, the handoff occurs, are they going to be impressed? Or are they going to wish that they hadn't bought? Right one of the two is going to happen. And if the handoff from sales, I'm feeling good. I bought it like wow, I just can't wait for this product or service. Eric really made sense. Like I've got these problems. And I think that they can solve them. And I'm really looking forward to it. And then Neil onboards me, and I've cut. I'm trusting Neil to like oh my god. This is person number two, in this organization that is really impressing me. Oh my god, this you know, 30 day. New Client onboarding process is amazing. It's very detailed. They asked me a lot of good questions. I really do feel like they can represent us in the right way. It's everything. It's connected. You know, a good onboarding process is connected to predictable results and a long term client relationship like what Jeff

Jeff Winters:

like exercise and how Happiness. Oh, good

Eric Watkins:

one. Good one a

Jeff Winters:

good one. Yeah, it's

Scott Scully:

good. It's a good one but nice,

Jeff Winters:

like me eating fettuccine alfredo and not sleeping well, like,

Eric Watkins:

like Jeff's golf balls finding the woods,

Scott Scully:

like Jeff, and the likelihood that he'll do a soup diet in the next 90 days. Correlation friends, anyway, I, this is one of the our areas, we're always looking at it, we're always focusing on it, because we know if we start clients off in the right way that we've just got a way better chance at continuing to build trust and predictable results. And we're going to have partners for a long, long time. What are you doing? What are you doing out there? In onboarding your new clients? Do you look at it? Do you run it through a project management process? Do you have somebody single handedly operating New Client Onboarding? It's something you should look at your career.

Eric Watkins:

I agree 110%. And I, okay, so you're in the spot right now where you have a salesperson that sells the deal. And typically, I feel like what happens is any sort of implementation, and maybe they don't even have a department, it's a person, whatever. They say, Okay, there's all these administrative things that need to happen. So I'll get somebody that's admitted administrative ly strong, to do some of that backend stuff. And then we'll just hand it off to our account management team, or maybe the sales rep continues that relationship. And I feel like that's where people mess up. Where we've messed up in the past, frankly, we actually put some of our best people in implementation, because it's that important. It's the foundation of the if you're building a house, it's the foundation, right? If sales, Senate straight to account management, it would be like selling someone on building them a house and then handing them off to the interior designer. And you're like, where, where's my basement? Where are the walls, where's the roof like that we are setting the foundation for everything else from there. And you that connection from sales to account management is where everything gets lost. So the ability for someone to make sure clients don't have to repeat themselves, all the information, what they're trying to achieve with the program is stored in one place and translated through anybody that's going to touch that account. It's just it's so crucial to our success. And us putting a better focus on that has dramatically decreased our churn right within the first 90 to 180 days of our programs.

Jeff Winters:

And that's the key. That's the key the outcome is, you don't think that lost revenue and customer loss is happening in the implementation or onboarding process. Because that's when customers are at their peak happiness. That's where it's happening. That's where you're losing. And I bet a lot of companies out there, you're listening, and what you're thinking is, we're fine. You know, we, we onboard it, and we sell the client, then it goes to an account manager, but here's what's missing. Are those account managers doing the same process every single time for every single client? And the answer is probably not, because it's so easy to overlook implementations. And I think not to make too much of a word. The word implementation is, to me is so much better than like, client intake, or onboarding or like implementation is like, we're going somewhere we're doing we are implementing a client, we're not just in, we're not going to do an intake. Now, this is, this is really important to go over that agreement that people you know, people sign agreements that go over the agreement, realign expectations, get them feeling great. And get ready for an awesome experience with your, with your team, because at the end of the day, like their implementation is the first experience they have with the service that they're going to be getting, or the product, they're going to be giving. No reason not to make it amazing.

Eric Watkins:

You You hit on a good point of if account managers are doing it, they're doing it in 100 different ways. And just as a business owner to be able to check the box of like, Alright, everybody got set up correctly, boom. So now, if there's an issue, it's on our service, right? It's on our service and our account management. And a lot of people are proud blending it all together, and they don't have a true picture of what's going on. Yep,

Scott Scully:

it's a good one. The homework would be take a look at it. Take a look at all of the clients that you brought on in the in the last year. What process did you take them through, you know, who does it? Is it documented? And you know, what, no better way to find out what clients are thinking then they ask a few of them. You know, get on the Get on the phone and survey a few of your clients and ask them about that first week, first 30 days first 90 days and and take a look. Pull up the hood and see see what's under underneath. Make sure you're doing the right things. And I think that that will help your business for sure. Great idea. All right, you know you don't get a new client into implementation without having a pre ductable sales pipeline,

Jeff Winters:

they call that a transition friends, that's a transition, they call it in the biz

Eric Watkins:

mining for growth gold. So we're all about driving leads in this section. So we're going to talk about SEO today. So we've talked a lot about, you can't just build a website from there, you have to be consistently writing content, you got to be putting gas in the engine, as we like to say, over and over again, to stay relevant, and to continue to increase your rank with Google. So let's assume that's step one, you got to be writing enough content, you have to be doing it consistently. Step two, I'm gonna give you something very simple of a way to increase your rank. Today, like you start doing this today, your results over this year are going to be dramatically different. And that is refreshing your content. It is refreshing your content. And it's such a simple concept. But oftentimes, you get into this habit, when you get to step one, you start writing content, you fall in love with writing new, new, new, new, new, and what happens if you hit you have these pages that are performing. And then over time, these pages start decaying or getting worse and worse over time. The reality is, in this day and age, we have more content than we've ever had before. So what you wrote one year ago, two years ago, there's been 1000s of new articles that have been written on that same exact topic that are now ranking ahead of your content. So what we talked about is in your, in your Google counsel, you'll you can see where your pages are ranking and how they've been ranking over time. If you're struggling with that, please reach out to us directly, we'll help you look at it. But the homework right now is to go to all those pages that are decaying and getting worse over time, and just refresh them stop the new content for a little bit, you can still have a certain percentage of it. But go refresh those pages. And just refreshing those pages that were performing in the past will dramatically increase your rank over the course of this year.

Jeff Winters:

My thought here is a love it. I mean, you you have to be doing it. It's easy. I think one thing to note, Scott, I feel like every time we talked to somebody and we talked about how many words a person can write, we're always surprised at the capacity, especially in today's day and age. And I wouldn't be afraid to push writers, I think you'd be you'd be shocked at somebody's ability to write 15,000 30,000 50,000 words a month. And thinking about how you're benchmarking writers in terms of words per month. Got to do the refreshes for sure. But don't be afraid to push writers in terms of words per month, because I feel like every time we talk about it, it's we hear another number we're like, oh, okay, there's another layer to this,

Scott Scully:

you have to have somebody that knows what they're doing. You just do so that you can determine whether or not updating, you could refresh or you could also add to Right, yeah, so as opposed to add a new an example of that would be you might have an industry specific service page. And on that page, you add more about what you do for an industry, you add a new case study, some of you may be thinking, refresh, I'm gonna go and kind of rewrite exactly what I wrote. And a lot of times what they're really talking about is I'm going to go look at that page or that blog. And I'm going to add to right, that's important to note. And if you have the right person in house or out of house, they'll be able to tell you what words matter what pages need adjustments, or refreshes, and and where new content is needed. There's there's a mixture of both. But the key here and Eric's hitting it on the head is, you know, if someone tells you you need to write X amount of words on a monthly basis, it doesn't have to be all brand new content. That's for sure.

Eric Watkins:

Scott, that's a great point. And you got to think about behind the scenes what's going on here. Google is seeing that you updated that article. It doesn't matter if you put one word on it, it you updated it, and it's looking at that content is new, like one hack is to add 2023 in as many of your content pages as possible, because then it's going to search for that year. And it's going to show that it's more relevant. But once one stat I saw I heard on a podcast, HubSpot, you know, industry leaders and marketing, huge response, future sponsor, 90% of the content they write is refreshing their old content. Now, I know that seems a little dramatic. We don't quite do that here. But that's, that's a lot. That's a lot. But you have old content out there. With just a couple tweaks, you can dramatically increase your rank.

Scott Scully:

You have to have the right strategy in place. So I'll keep hitting on that. I know a lot of people are We're hearing that they can write 100,000 words in 30 seconds with Chad GPT. And you can not that drastic. But, man, if you don't know what you're doing, if you if you don't know how to look at the keywords, put the right strategy in place, if you don't have the right tools, you're going to you're actually going to hurt your rank, especially when people are saying that Chet GPT is a threat to Google, you think Google's not, you know, notices listening to that you think they're not going to penalize you for AI driven content, there's certainly a lot of tools that are being developed that'll, you know, use AI to write a lot more content in a hurry, and then they'll bring it out and mix it up or use a human than to, you know, put it in in a condition that would be powerful on Google. But just because you're hearing that you can go out on chat GPT and write a blog and, you know, five minutes, does not mean that you know how the hell to go use that blog. So do not make that mistake, for sure. All right. That's a great tip, Eric, now that we've got all kinds of refreshed content, we're sitting on a pile of leads and predictable pipeline, what is our sales team going to do?

Jeff Winters:

You know what they're going to do, Scott, they're not going to rely on that pile of leads, or love that our sales team is going to embrace that pile of leads. But our sales team is not going to be solely reliant on that pile of leads, because you know what our sales team is going to do. They're going to self source, they're going to self source and salespeople are putting me on mute. They're turning me off. They're covering their kids ears if they're listening to it, the car, but it needs to be said and it needs to be heard. This one's gonna hurt. Non some not most all. All salespeople need to be self sourcing. They do. Even the biggest baddest, making $2 million a deal huge ERP and you need to be cold calling. You need to be reaching out on LinkedIn, you need to be emailing, you need to be scheduling your own meetings. And I'll tell you why. Because that big old pile leads everything Eric just said about Google, and how it works could change later this afternoon. And then that big ol pile of leads that you had ain't there anymore? And what are you going to do? You're going to call Google and ask for your money back. Who are you going to call? You're going to call nobody? So in order to fortify and I use the word fortify? I think it's a very, yes, it will work. In order to fortify your pipeline and your sales team and your goals. You must have your salespeople self sourcing, irrespective of how senior they are,

Scott Scully:

we're spending a lot on sales enablement, right. And we're getting people, as many as 3540 45 new sales presentations from sales enablement on a monthly basis. But if you look at that, that's two or three sales presentations a day, right? Not not even through, we don't have anybody that's averaging three new sales presentations a day, another certainly follow up and everything that goes with it. But there's time. And we've done the math here, if if people just on our team made sure to have one new appointment set on a daily basis, given our show rates and close rates, it's probably two more new clients, or 24 for the year as a drastic increase in income. Right? Or something happens in sales enablement and goes backwards and you get two deals. And now you were normally getting x from sales enablement. You know, your two deals that you self sourced either ensure that you don't have the drop off or that you make more income. As an individual contributor, salesperson, I would I do that I put my schedule together my playbook. And I'd make sure that I had X amount of time every single day, generating my own pipeline. To supplement the pipeline I'm getting from sales enablement, and you will crush goals.

Eric Watkins:

I think there's two huge benefits here. Number one, sales reps. Self sourcing actually increases their close rate on all the other leads. Because they understand the value of a pitch. It's probably right. They're not going into pitches, thinking like oh man, this one's a little small or this isn't quite the right person. It's like, this is awesome. I got a pitch on my calendar. And I because I know how hard this is because I just did it at 10 o'clock today. So I think that's number one. The second thing at the end of the day sales is just an anxiety ridden profession. It's got its ups and downs. And you can literally take control of that you can control your future. You if you take all right I'm supposed to give 40 leads, well, let's say I got 20 leads, what would I need to do myself to hit my goal every single month and never have to worry about it. If you just committed to that, and you had to go get yourself one self source pitch a month to make up for it. And you did that you never have to worry about missing goal ever. And then on your good months where sales enablement goes overboard, you crush goal, you crush go, I just think the quality of life in sales dramatically increases when you take control of your destiny.

Scott Scully:

You know what I'm thinking about here? This is going to be controversial, especially when, like, god forbid you try to make a LinkedIn post about this topic, we're gonna get just mangled, can hear the comments are going to be like this. Well, then you're doing sales enablement all wrong, like you're failing your salespeople, because they should be able to just remain closing. So you're going to have to look at your sales enablement, processes. So here's what I'm going to say to all of you that are listening. It's our business, we have 550, sales enablement, people, everyone in the building does this for a living. There's nobody that studies this harder. And guess what, we would never tell anyone that we sold our products and services to that it's enough ever, we'd say it's the first thing that you need to do towards having a predictable sales pipeline, but we would never tell them to completely stop activity on their end. Ever, ever, ever. There's nobody that studies this harder than we do. And it's not perfect for so many reasons. Google out algorithms, people getting sick or turning over email deliverability spam, from a phone call perspective, there's always hurdles and things that are in the way, it's never going to be perfect. We're always working on it. If you're not supplementing as a company or as a salesperson, you're not going to crush goals like you could. You can't just sit there and rely on sales enablement, you can't do it

Jeff Winters:

got to have both gotta have like, that's the key here. Like if and if we were having the other side of the argument of you should only have salespeople sourcing their own meetings. And that's the entire so we'd be up in arms about that, too. Yeah, because that's insane.

Eric Watkins:

That's insane. Just a little bit 10% Just

Jeff Winters:

10% 13% you know, like diversify multiple buckets,

Eric Watkins:

our best sales rep does it every single month period,

Scott Scully:

you could make$200,000. Or you could make$300,000 and work the same amount of time. Right? Still go home at six. Yes. Like self source. Set aside your time. Self source. All right. Incredible stuff now. I think we're unfortunately,

Eric Watkins:

playing it. Yeah, that's the best part. To do or not to do I have a good one today. Have a good one. today. We all like a good dinner. We all like going out to the restaurants. And you know, one of my favorite things is just trying someplace new. I want to go to a new restaurant that I haven't been to. But here's the here's the thought. Do you just go to the restaurant and look at the menu when you get there? Or do you look at the menu before?

Jeff Winters:

I think anybody that looks at the menu before going to arrive to figure out what you're gonna get two o'clock in the afternoon on Saturday. You sitting around figuring out what you're going to eat for like, part of the dinner is the surprise of the menu. It's like do you call the other couple you're going out with at two o'clock in the afternoon and have like a pre conversation now like part of the double date is that you didn't know what you were going to talk about in part of the dinners. You didn't know what you were gonna order. I got people. You go online, look up Google Images. No, go to the restaurant be surprised and delighted by the menu. Blah, blah.

Eric Watkins:

Scott, what do you think?

Scott Scully:

I think Jeff's ridiculous as always, I'm not going to look at the menu and decide exactly what I'm eating. But I am going to look at the menu and determine whether or not there are items that I would like, because maybe it's just me, but there's certain types of food that I don't like. And as far as the double date goes, Yeah, I might call my double date partners and say, I'm not going to that restaurant. We're changing it up or going somewhere else at a pre

Jeff Winters:

conversation browse.

Eric Watkins:

That's not a selection. That's a browse, and it's just doing a little browse.

Scott Scully:

You can't browse you can

Eric Watkins:

I gotta say so my fiance has a good peanut allergies. So there's now this like, she has to look at the menu before we go anywhere. And I don't love it. I don't love it because I'm kind of getting a little bit of insight. I'm the type of person I can order in two minutes. You put me on this spot just start with somebody else you get around to me. I'll know what I'll have. Biden. However, my one flaw in life I don't have many. It's one you only have one. I only have one, just one. When I order food, I'm very indecisive. So by the time I give you my order, and the waiter starts walking away, I might make I'll be that guy that's like, you know what, wait, I'm going to switch. I'm gonna switch to the tortellini. Scott's getting the tortellini, I'm gonna get the score.

Jeff Winters:

Do you switch? No. Well, why would you switch? You know what you're getting?

Scott Scully:

I don't know what I'm doing twice.

Eric Watkins:

He ordered it to go and then sat down and ate just to make sure it was ready. Set it all. I think we set it off.

Scott Scully:

All right. It has been another wonderful show. Well, we hope you think it's been a wonderful show. Check out our posts on LinkedIn. We drill into these topics out on LinkedIn as well. So Eric, Jeff and myself, please follow us and engage with us there. It's a perfect opportunity to give us your opinions and your ideas. God knows other people are doing it you might you might.

Jeff Winters:

We drill into these topics and they drill.

Scott Scully:

So you might as well and like, subscribe, share and, as always, always be growing.

Eric Watkins:

Let's grow. Let's grow that's

Unknown:

the growth show is sponsored by abstract talent solutions, recruiting for the modern world.

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