The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Season 2, Episode 6 - Implement an A-Player Score for Every Team Member

January 21, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Season 2, Episode 6 - Implement an A-Player Score for Every Team Member
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Your team members need to know what success looks like every single day. What are the activities / standards that need to be met every day to WIN that day. We’ve tried all kinds of different ways to do this but the one that worked the best is what we call the A-Player Score.

Thanks for listening!

Scott Scully:

Welcome back, grow nation. As always, we are here giving you business growth tips for your journey from zero to $50 million. I'm here with my partners in crime, Eric Watkins and Jeff winters. Very fired up about today,

Eric Watkins:

I'm fired up another good episode bringing the heat, trying to give you some tips, some things to do not to do to hit 50 million in business.

Scott Scully:

Jeff, one of my great pleasures in life, is that you have been you are so proclaimed cop.

Jeff Winters:

This is so funny that you think I find my calling as a guy that trolls people on LinkedIn, you. I've done a lot of things in my life. And you're like totally convinced that this is my seminal moment.

Scott Scully:

I think there are millions of people in the world that are being impacted, because you now are policing the ship pasture.

Jeff Winters:

Ship on LinkedIn didn't used to be a ship pasture.

Scott Scully:

So we're heading straight to two truths, and a lie from LinkedIn to truths. And

Jeff Winters:

it's so hard to go first.

Eric Watkins:

Hey, Jeff, before you go, I know our producer has been giving you some feedback on how hard you're breathing into the mic. But could you could you just make sure to stay at a at a reasonable distance. And everybody out there? Please listen in close to see if Jeff is breathing too hard. As we're going through this episode,

Jeff Winters:

can I tell you something, she'll never hear this because we have millions of listeners. She's just not one of them. My wife constantly critiques me on how loud I'm breathing. And I've always thought this whole time, it's just because she's like, done with me. So just try to hold your breath as long as you can. And we'll figure out the rest of it. But that was my working theory. But now I've been told, by the way, try this. If you're in the audience out there trying to have somebody tells you you're breathing too loud, and you want to fix it. That's a very hard thing to fix. That's not like getting a haircut like now I'm focusing on how much and I'm breathing. It's a difficult thing. All right. So let's get just get right into Two Truths and a Lie from LinkedIn. We have some fun, but it's important. LinkedIn used to be a play wasn't a ship pastor hasn't always been a ship. It's not all shit in the pasture. But some of it is a ship pasture because people have come up with the strategy that the way to win in sales, the way to win in business is push out stuff on LinkedIn. And let me say this, all recommendations are not created equally. And that's what we're here for. We're here to separate the stuff that you should run back and take to your business and implement tomorrow, versus the stuff you should cast off. And today, I think we've got some really good ones I want to start. And I want to get the name right. I think it's Sybil to HAR and Sybil says, don't expect 100% productivity from a new employee, if you're giving them 1% training. Don't expect 100% productivity from a new employee if you're giving them new training. This is for everyone. Because we all have new employees. Right now, this is very topical, there are lots of new employees, and people. So underestimate how much training even experienced newer employees to your organization need. And we do it in the budgeting process when we expect salespeople to be at fully ramped up and able to sell their quota too fast. We underestimate it with accountants, we underestimated it and finance and customer success and facilities. We just did. Yeah, we're gonna hire them, and they're going to shadow somebody, and they're going to know their job. And that is not true. You need to invest protect all the time and training, particularly on the front end. This drives me crazy. I hate this. You must must must invest in training new people, or don't expect them to be great, because that's that's the rules. This one's a

Scott Scully:

hard one for me. I have two comments. First of all truth. It's hard to argue that if you had better training that you couldn't have somebody ramp up faster. Right. That's so of course, I think that that's a good post. But now I want to I want to talk to the individual contributors out there. Do not make it an excuse that your company doesn't have great training. Oh, that's a good point. I hate hearing. That's a good point. Like look i A lot of us came from. Well, I mean, we were entrepreneurial right in the beginning stages of something. There's just not a lot of things laid out for people and the ones that have moved the fastest and that's organization that were here in the beginning were the ones that helped us and help themselves. If you're an individual contributor out there listening, whether you're coming When he has good training or not, it is on you to go figure out your industry, your job, your position and be the best that you can be. By the way, if you do that, you'll be invaluable, though you'll get shoved to new heights in your organization. But of course, have the best training that you can have as an as a company.

Eric Watkins:

I agree with everything that Scott said, and I agree that this overall the post is true, I would say, with your training, the only way to know if it's good or not, is if it's the same every time and you have it built out. And there's a process that they go through. And then there's very key results tied to that training. So if you're just bringing somebody in and saying, All right, go get them talk to Jeff, he's the best at this. He'll he'll show you the ropes, then you don't know. I mean, you're obviously that training is not good. But you got to continually evaluate that.

Scott Scully:

truth, truth Truth,

Jeff Winters:

I can't say, I've ever felt more passionate about this next truth. And I'm going to divert this is not a business truth. It's not a business truth. It's on LinkedIn. But it is a truth that needs to be shouted from the heavens. Comes from Samantha McKenna. I have adopted a travel habit over the years, every time I exit the plane, I thank the staff and try to shout loud enough for the pilots to hear me. And almost every time I exit my lift, I specifically say thanks for getting us here safely. Thank your pilots. The crew on the airplane. You're lifting Uber drivers. These people have incredibly hard jobs. They're getting you where you need to go safely is a truth. And it's important. And we have business travelers out there and business travelers back and it should be back. Thank your pilots. Thank the crew on the airplanes. Thank you're lifting truth. Truth,

Eric Watkins:

I hate flying, I will kiss the pilot if they get me there safely. I am a gift I

Scott Scully:

can't wait to fly with you next. I'm gonna hold you to that truth, truth.

Jeff Winters:

And now this post is the reason this segment was invented. This one This one it's like indisputably wrong. And I might. I am an expert on very few things, as you all know, aside from hard breathing, and maybe that's it. But I do know this

Eric Watkins:

fad diets,

Scott Scully:

this, this person is going to be in jail for having time

Jeff Winters:

Kevin, put up one of those scrollers on LinkedIn, you know, which I really do. I'm very hooked on the scrolling. I'll scroll through anything, like one of those, like, side by side, a little teaser, you know, it's like gives you like a little bit and it's like, oh, and then next and I go oh, yeah, give me the next. And he's talking about calls to action. In emails like prospecting email. So this is, you know, you everybody send him prospecting emails. It's your sphere of greatness. Again, this and this and loud breathing. How many millions of emails do we send, send approximately 9 million a month for ever. But Kevin says, never asked for 15 or 20 minutes. Nobody has the time. There are 10 other salespeople hitting them up that day for 15 or 20 minutes on their calendar. That's wrong. That's just wrong. Like that is a that is a wrong thing. Like if people take that, like at the bottom of your email, you're sending a prospecting email, suggesting that you should not ask for 15 or 20 minutes because it's not going to work. What should did he say what you should ask for? On this one, it said who would be the best person to chat with and this particular in this in this like in this carousel? Yeah, he's analyzing a particular email. But like I think the broad recommendation is never He says never asked for 50. That is just so wrong. We

Eric Watkins:

set like a zillion appointments a month while asking for

Jeff Winters:

20,000 A year 20,000 A year. And that advice is bad. Like that is bad advice. I'm not saying you shouldn't mix up your call to action at the end of your email. But he says never and that is bad. And if people do that they will get less meetings. We scheduled 20,000 a year. Bad advice,

Scott Scully:

Kevin. People who say that about cold calls to to not say that, right. So how long is is Kevin in jail?

Eric Watkins:

Do you think LinkedIn will give you the ability to suspend accounts you'll be that sought out as the Sheriff of LinkedIn. I could see that happening. I

Jeff Winters:

don't want to say contacted me from LinkedIn corporate. But let's just say I may have some special privileges.

Eric Watkins:

Okay, I like it.

Scott Scully:

Again, thank you.

Eric Watkins:

Thank you. That's important sheriff.

Scott Scully:

Thank you Sure. See, and it will there will there be a LinkedIn is Most Wanted. Oh,

Eric Watkins:

oh ads.

Jeff Winters:

Now we're talking, that's a carousel like number one most wanted. So when

Scott Scully:

we make our posts on LinkedIn, maybe we should put out into the world. LinkedIn is most wanted, Kevin is now at the top of the list. Kevin, you're a liar.

Jeff Winters:

Don't ask for time, right? Lie, don't lie.

Scott Scully:

Okay, we are at the 50. For 50. Again, we've had 30 years of business experience, year over year growth, certainly made mistakes along the way. But in this section, we'd like to talk about the 50 things that we would implement no matter what we would bet on these things. Take them to the bank. Here's the next one. And a player score, we implement an A player score, which basically is made up of the top metrics, things that are most important within each position in the building. We do that, because we want to provide total clarity in what a job well done is daily, weekly, monthly. There are 1000s of businesses that have an annual review, right that that's pretty much when somebody hears whether or not they've done a good job, when they're sitting at the table, they go through the review, they get their three, four or 5% raise or not based on their performance. Nobody wants that anymore. They want transparency, they want to know how their position rolls up into the success of the organization. They want to know right now, what a good job is, and what success looks like. So you have to have an A player score for every position in the building. If it's a sales position, it might be prospecting dials, number of appointments, pitches, held, close, you know, show rates, close rates, revenue, if it's somebody that's answering the phones, it could be time to get to the phone, dropped calls, quality on that call, routing somebody to the right person to answer their question, you know your business better than we do. But you've got to look through your organization, make sure that you line out top processes, put a score around those top processes and give somebody that score. On a daily basis, we use Salesforce. So you know, to automate it. You all have different CRMs I'm sure that you use. If you have any questions about setting up an A player score, by all means, on the side, get a hold of us, we'll walk you through it. But guys, wouldn't you agreed like just somebody knowing on a daily basis, what success looks like what you expect out of them. And then having that opportunity to be able to celebrate that person in real time is super important. And a huge part of our success.

Eric Watkins:

Absolutely. Absolutely. And this ends the debate over, you know, am I being effective, you know, I'm doing you know, the person who's getting their job done in seven hours, and they're absolutely crushing it from this a player score versus the person who's working 12 hours and not hitting any of their metrics or results. I think that I think it solves that debate. And it shows who's being effective and efficient with their time. I love these tips. Because all these tips, again, are not for companies who don't want to grow their business, right. So the a player score, we want to hit results, not just this month, but next month, the month after that, and the month after that. And what I love about this score, is it's the perfect mix of leading and lagging indicators. Most people really lean heavily on the lagging indicators, the ultimate results, the sales number, but you got to be looking at the close rate the pitches held the prospecting dials, because those are the things that are not just going to pay off this month, but months in advance. And I think that's super important.

Jeff Winters:

It acts as not not another manager but it acts as this, like reference guide this accountability partner. It's every it's all of those things because what you have to avoid at all costs is I don't know how to be successful my job. Nobody told me what I needed to do be successful. My job, you have to avoid that at all costs. And for some people, no matter how many times you tell them, that it just it evades them and eludes them. This is the ultimate Wait a minute. This is what you have to do to be successful at your job. And I think people try to oversimplify jobs, sometimes we're gonna look we got to give somebody one metric. No, you don't stop that. You don't need to give somebody one metric. Because to Eric's point, if you give them one metric, then you you're fighting it out, and then your exact meanings about whether it's a leading indicator or lagging indicator. You have to have both. You have to have a way to incorporate both. That's not burdensome, that's not hard to calculate and then ultimately rolls up into one metric of success that people can know instantly. Am I doing a good job or not? And like the annual review of the annual review is useless in the app. sense of intermediate checkpoints for why would I call you and go? Hey, I just want to let you know you did a shit job this year.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah. Cool. Thanks for letting me know. Yeah. And I saved it up all year to tell you right at the end, I wanted to let you know now

Jeff Winters:

you did a shit job. Oh, cool. That's, that's helpful.

Eric Watkins:

Right? Yeah. Or, hey, wanted to let you know you did a great job. Yeah, well, unfortunately, I left your company three months ago, because no one recognized for the hard work I was I just realized

Jeff Winters:

Nice work. Yeah, dummy,

Scott Scully:

the annual review. And less, it's a wrap up of all of the conversations that you've had throughout the year, and just an extra opportunity to, you know, review those things that they should already know, the annual review should be eliminated if it doesn't do that. Alright, I've been thinking about this section. And I know that nobody likes homework. But here's how I feel. If you're going to murder growth, I'm going to give you homework, and each one of these episodes, here's my homework. Sit down. When you get 1520 minutes, think about the different positions within your organization. And write down the top five most important metrics for every single position in your building, and then rank them, rank them and see where you're at. That's your only project for now. But I think you're going to understand after doing that exercise, why you need a player score, because there are going to be some people that are not where you need them to be for success. And there's also going to be some positions that I bet aren't clearly defined, because it's super hard to actually come up with that score. That's your homework. Take it to the bank. So with that we head into mining for growth gold. With Eric, what do you got today,

Eric Watkins:

mining for growth gold. So today, I have an oldie but a goodie. You know, I a lot of things, you know, I may feel like they're common knowledge, because I've been around it for so long. But I think a lot of people who are starting out or doing this themselves, they may not know these things. So today, for cold calling, what we're going to be talking about is closing assumptive li with two dates and times, there's two parts of a call that are really uncomfortable, especially for people that aren't experienced in cold calling. That is the intro because you're interrupting whatever they're doing in the day. And that is the closing asking for the appointment. So two super, super crucial parts of the call that you should know, like your ABCs like your pledge of allegiance. So a lot of times what happens? People have a great comp, great intro, get them invested into a good conversation, have a great conversation, and then they get to the end. And they're like, Well, you know, Jeff, I'm not sure if you would maybe potentially want to meet with us. Maybe next week. I don't know if you have any availability or not. A lot of Mother Mae eyes very tentative. Like, I'm not I'm not sure if this would be best, but would you be interested in? Okay, if I'm Jeff, and I'm sitting there, I'm already not interested based on the way that you're asking me because it doesn't sound like I should be interested. Right. So the assumptive part is super important. And then we coach to use the assumptive part with to date. So here would be an example, Jeff, based on what you shared with me today, I think it would make a lot of sense for you to sit down with Scott, to talk about how you could improve your sales pipeline for your organization. He actually has time next Thursday at one or Friday at two, which of those would work best for you. So that did a couple things. One, typically, what the prospect is going to say there is they're no longer objecting to the appointment, they're objecting to the top, which is semantics. From that point. I can take that, you know, now we're just finding the best time on the calendar, very easy problem to solve. And I'm doing it as subjectively it sounds like Jeff should be sitting down with us. So I think this is really important. It's something super simple. There's a couple different ways you can do it. Jeff, are you a morning or an afternoon person? Do you like meeting before after lunch? Different things like that to just get them focused to object to the time and then that's the easier problem itself?

Scott Scully:

Eric, you know what, I think the most important part of this is just getting back to scarcity. Like we used to teach this a lot. And it was you know, it's when we're calling in the auto industry, right? It's like there's it's a big deal when we were using scarcity, not only an exclusivity and a niche, but time. That's like Oh, all right. We're in Cleveland next Tuesday and Wednesday. pretty booked So far, we have four of the six of you lined up in the Nissan Nissan franchise. Looks like Eric has eight on Tuesday. And let's see, if we could probably do a three on Friday. Which one of those can we put you into? Don't don't want you to miss out on this opportunity. It's amazing. The how that Scott this the appointment skyrocket? Oh yeah. So it's got to be. If you're calling me to schedule a time and I'm trying to find a bucket to fit him in to then that person's not thinking oh, yeah, cuz that's the mistake people make. They're like, well, could you meet Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,

Eric Watkins:

we're wide open, do you want to do work? Or do we have to talk to new reps about that all the time? We could meet when do you want to? Whenever you want to meet a

Scott Scully:

man, imagine how you feel if someone's calling you to set an appointment, and they're having a hard time finding a slot to fit you in, you're like, oh, shit, maybe I shouldn't meet with this person. They can't even find two different time periods in the next week to fit me into.

Eric Watkins:

It's also real black. A lot of our partners too are busy and they're running their businesses. They don't have a whole lot of like, right? It's important. Yeah.

Jeff Winters:

And, and I'm getting better. I'm learning I'm not. Manager Ben Tre, I've done plenty cold calling, but like the, the ways. And I think one expert thing that I've learned from you to schedule and to schedule 100,000 cold call meetings a year is I think the inclination is to push the meeting scheduling to next week or two. What are you doing on the 15th? And it's the first and it's that was what I always thought like, hey, book it about a week out? And where I've come to learn from you all who are the jet eyes on this? is hey, look, Scott's Scott's totally booked for the rest of the afternoon like chock full couldn't squeegee and even if we wanted to, but tomorrow. He's got a two and a three. Yeah. Are you totally booked those talks? So so there you go. Like that, to me is is it is something that I've learned from you all is a week out is, is you're gonna decrease your show rates dramatically. Today totally booked. Tomorrow. Got a couple of spots. But for tomorrow. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

I love that you're bringing this up. And on that other episode, when we're talking about scarcity, I think the two of them together are super important. And again, you said it's real, they are busy. But But you can't just say when do you want to meet? It's got to be one of those two time periods. But then I feel like an important part of that is why, like, if they don't book at two, on Tuesday or five on Friday, what are they missing out on? Yeah, like make me feel like I'm missing the concert, there's two tickets left to the concert. If you can do that, you will set more appointments.

Eric Watkins:

Yep. And here is the hidden value of this. When you close a selectively it is hard to object to what you're saying. Because I have to give you a reason on why I don't like it to not just object to the times I have to come back with a reason. So this is why I encourage people to close on every call. Every call you get into a meaningful conversation close, whether it's gonna be a good fit or not. Because you immediately know where you stand with that prospect. And if the timing doesn't add up, then at least you have all that information and data for the future. Truth Truth. Oh,

Jeff Winters:

is that the wrong section? Yeah,

Eric Watkins:

wrong section.

Scott Scully:

But it's true. Total truth. Truth. All right, well, gold,

Jeff Winters:

it is gold gold.

Scott Scully:

Neil. The producer says, now that's gold. That's gold, gold. All right. Now you have more leads, because you've set more appointments, Jeff, Tales from sales. What do they do with these leads?

Jeff Winters:

They close them? And do you know what kind of sales reps, close deals, motivated sales reps, quarters, status, motivated sales reps, close deals. I have the data to prove it. Motivated sales reps, close motor deals and unmotivated sales reps. Neil note that mark it down, put it in the downloadable. And I'm going to share a time honored way to get sales reps motivated. And some of you hate this. But if done right, it works. It will always work. And I'll give you an example of my favorite current way to to make it work right now. Sales contests, sales contests work, amen to motivate salespeople, but not all of them. Just the good ones. Shitty sales contests still suck and don't work and you're wasting your money. And you're sitting there and you're going oh, we just paid an extra X amount of money to get this Same amount of sales we would have gotten last month. And that's probably true. But here's the reality. The difference between a sales rep pushing for that one last deal are those two last deals, or a difference between a high performing sales rep looking at a mid performing sales rep, and that mid performing sales rep feeling guilty for not getting that last deal or pushing hard enough that you have to somehow find that energy, and sales contests is a great way to create that energy. Here's an example of a sales contest I've loved recently that you could put into play today. And I think your people will absolutely get a kick out of it. So and I stole it from somebody and shame on me for not remembering. What we've done is I've gotten the names of our sales reps, or our managers, directors, whomever, their partner's wife, husband, best friend, whatever. And I've said, Give me that person's email address and excluding you, I'm going to email them and ask them what you would want if you hit a goal. And they can't tell you it's a secret. And here's why this is so brilliant, fascinating. It's this is a study in human psychology. Number one, it's great. Because this person now knows, like whoever this other person is, knows that their their partner or best friend, or spouse, or whatever, is gunning for this thing at work. And they asked him about him outside of work, which is great. There's like this accountability, like at home or wherever. It's also a thing. So it's probably something that the person wouldn't buy themselves. And it adds to this general excitement, and it's personal. It's something that they care about, not that everyone would care about. It's a really interesting study in human psychology, you can do it today, it doesn't have to be super expensive. Tell the other person the Secret Santa, if you will, exactly how much they can spend if the person hits their goal, and they will tell you what the price is that that person wants, if they hit their goal, or if the team hits the goal. It will work. Put it in place today. People are way motivated. When somebody else picks their price.

Eric Watkins:

I love it. As soon as you told me that I immediately stole it and did it and it worked like a charm.

Jeff Winters:

And it's gold. It's gold.

Scott Scully:

I love it. What's the most interesting thing that a spouse girlfriend boyfriend significant other has said like what what is there anything funny that somebody

Jeff Winters:

now it's not really the best part is Jeff doesn't ever actually bite? I don't know I did. I actually just did. I could tell you exactly what who's a treadmill is the best I loved it. It's, it's not nothing is just for hitting a huge goal. It was like, it was a treadmill for this person who runs marathons and stuff in the winter. And the spouse is like, she's gonna she's training to run a marathon next year. It's cold winter, she's not gonna run outside specific treadmill, and it's going to arrive at this huge bar. She's getting a treadmill for hitting this ridiculous goal that we've never hit before that point. And we have never hit since that point.

Scott Scully:

Love up so specific to the individual I love right? Yeah.

Eric Watkins:

Nice, nice, good stuff. Tales from sales from

Scott Scully:

sales. Implement that one immediately.

Eric Watkins:

It's not always the X's and O's. You know, I love that. You know, we can give them all the tricks in the book, but they got to have motivated sales reps. Right.

Scott Scully:

So I think I think, you know, the millions around the planet are tuned in for some business growth tips. But some have suggested, maybe they're just getting through the podcast to get to the section. Because it might be their favorite.

Eric Watkins:

They're skipping through to this action. Let's be real. There's common to to do or not to do I have to put it in there because they're waiting to hear it to skip to this section. Okay. So to do or not to do. This one will cause fights. People will be fighting over this Christmas holiday season. Everybody likes to get a Christmas or holiday tree in their house. Should you go out and get a real tree? Or should you spend the money and have a fake tree with the lights ready to go everything?

Scott Scully:

This one's fun?

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, which one? Which one?

Scott Scully:

You're you know, I'm not even sure you can weigh in on I do have I can

Eric Watkins:

I have my first year as a homeowner with a tree in my house but

Scott Scully:

no kids yet? No kids yet. And so when we talk about this, I feel like there's going to be a couple of answers, but then the kids will eventually steer the final steer. Jeff's looking at me like Yeah, well,

Jeff Winters:

I actually really can't weigh in on this one.

Eric Watkins:

No tree.

Jeff Winters:

menorah it's amazing. Eight days baby overlaps with Christmas this year to shout out Hanukkah all the Hanukkah listeners to do tree, the tree everyone gets a tree.

Scott Scully:

Let me tell you how I feel about this. You said

Eric Watkins:

secret saying earlier everyone you said, you said Secret Santa and it confirmed that I should go forward with you know,

Jeff Winters:

get out a little bit,

Scott Scully:

not kneel, kneel do not cut this one.

Jeff Winters:

Everyone has the Easter Bunny come to their kids school. Not true, not everyone.

Scott Scully:

This part of the episode. All right, as somebody who celebrates Christmas there's nothing better than taking your little kid out to a tree lot or if you're on a farm going out and cutting one down and making it part of the tradition. And then they get older. And you get to a point where your kids are like looking at you fighting on the way to the tree lot. Like are you kidding me? Nobody wants to go cut a tree dad. And that is when you go find the fake tree that looks the most like the real tree so you don't have to hear the ship. And then there will be a point when they start giving you shit about decorating the tree where you wish that you could put it in wet. Like if you have a big enough home, you would leave it decorated and put it in the closet and pull it out so that you wouldn't have to hear about going to get the tree or decorating the tree. That's what would happen. How would you do that? No. I want to though I've heard he went through yet one more year of who wanted to agree three. It was amazing tradition. Yeah, it's bitching you outsource it? No, I do not. You would,

Jeff Winters:

don't you outsource. I do to be honest with you. I do not outsource decorating to

Scott Scully:

outsource decorating the tree. I make them do it. So that we can get together but it is becoming hard with a 19 year old and a 17 year old. It's not a fun holiday thing anymore.

Eric Watkins:

I heard of somebody who put a like 20 foot closet big enough to just fit a tree in their foyer or whatever. And they just pop it in, pop it out. sounded amazing.

Jeff Winters:

Not being super familiar with the going to get the tree thing. I always sort of equated it in my head for no particular reason to like go into the pumpkin patch. Like I'm gonna go get a pumpkin I'm gonna carve the fucking thing. That's gonna be Yeah, but I suspect it's more it's more involved.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, I did my actually first I grew up with fake tree my whole life. And then this past year, me and my girlfriend went and got a real tree. I was like I don't know I wasn't sold on it. And then we brought it back and we carried it in the house. I got SAP all over my hands everything's sticky everything's there's I mean I'm smell I know this smell is good. And then it shattered everywhere you know? I was like I don't know if I'm I think I'm fake tree. I think I'm Team fake tree but I'm gonna go get a real tree one more I'm gonna give it one more year then we'll see

Jeff Winters:

most people get fake or real

Scott Scully:

trees depends on if you're like Eric who outsources walking his dog. It's like he definitely

Eric Watkins:

can't device it. It's divisive.

Jeff Winters:

What's the stat Eric you in your head? What's the official World statistics on real versus fake tree?

Eric Watkins:

46.5% Fake it sounds right. 53.5% real good topic though. Thanks for your contribution. Jeff. Really appreciate it.

Jeff Winters:

Everyone gets a tree. Well, not everyone,

Scott Scully:

maybe not as always to do or not to do is listen to it or not take the advice or not take it to the bank on our other sections to do or not to do might be just a little bit more about the fun. We're

Eric Watkins:

leaving it out there shout out Jake Van Hook for giving me that topic to

Jeff Winters:

do or not to do assume everyone gets a tree.

Scott Scully:

Eric has learned guys. We hope you have a good week, reminding you to be kind grow and grind.

Eric Watkins:

Let's grow. Let's grow up. Let's grow. The grow show was sponsored by Bionic SDR outreach playbook design.

Two Truths and a Lie from LinkedIn
50 for 50
Mining for Growth Gold
Tales from Sales
To Do or Not to Do