The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Season 2, Episode 5 - Why Quality Should be a KPI for All Positions

January 12, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Season 2, Episode 5 - Why Quality Should be a KPI for All Positions
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Quality KPIs should be a top priority for every business. It's not just about measuring the success of your products or services; quality KPIs also provide insight into how well your team is performing, whether your processes are efficient, and how effective your strategies are. 

Thanks for listening!

Scott Scully:

Welcome back grow nation, the growth, the growth options. We have another episode of fire. We are totally excited today to bring you some tips to make it just a little bit easier to go from zero to 50 mil. We have been there done that. And man, we don't want it to be as hard on you, Jeff, you excited about today?

Jeff Winters:

I'm very excited about today. I think today's gonna be the best episode we've ever had. In fact, I don't think I know.

Scott Scully:

Eric, you came in touting some huge numbers for our podcast from a listenership. Yeah, I

Eric Watkins:

think we just surpassed 5 million numbers. Not official. But what I saw 5 million listeners. So still counting? Yeah. Still counts going up? Yeah, it's like, I mean, it may be off by a few one or two, etc. But now I'm fired up. Yeah. This is this is taken off.

Scott Scully:

No doubt. Look, there is a list that's out there that says, We are the top podcast in the planet.

Eric Watkins:

I know. And I think we have more viewers than anything in the world right now. Outside of Kanye's tweets. He just got shut down again. The third.

Scott Scully:

Oh, funny, but not funny.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah. Not funny. But onto growing your business

Scott Scully:

On to growing your business? Well, you know what we like to start with Two Truths, and a Lie.

Jeff Winters:

Two Truths, and a Lie. Has it ever been more important to police LinkedIn? For the people I can tell you, even since we started this new segment, not but a few months ago, it's gotten worse. LinkedIn has gotten worse. As we say, every episode, this is important. We have some fun, but it's important. LinkedIn used to be a place where you could go to reliably get great advice, you could take it to the bank. And now it is not. And kidding aside, if you take some of this advice and put it into practice in your business, it could have suboptimal results. So we have taken it upon ourselves to find two things every week, we know or think very strongly to be true. And one that we think is a lie.

Eric Watkins:

I do have to say yeah, I see you kind of walking around more your shoulders are back, you know as the the official sheriff of LinkedIn. I feel like your your, your ego is continuing to grow of like, you just feel like you're really doing a service for the people - cue the horse noise.

Jeff Winters:

I have my own sound effects.

Scott Scully:

I'm glad we have you.

Eric Watkins:

here's to protect the people.

Jeff Winters:

We're here to protect the people. Right? Yeah. Let me take off my hat, my cool aviators, share the first truth of this week, which comes from Isaac Tweedale, who says, Why do we glorify sports, hustle culture, but then demonize entrepreneurs? No one would ever call the level of commitment to sport, quote, toxic. But what's so different about athletes and founders, both groups experienced the same sacrifices. In fact, great athletes often make brilliant entrepreneurs. If anything, sports is a more selfish endeavor, starting a business can impact millions of lives. If you're an athlete, your impact is limited. Yet, we hold up athletes as Gods this is. So that's the end of the quote. And this leads into what I think is one of the most topical controversial topics in business today, which is this hustle culture. And it is so true to me, we constantly laud athletes for the time they put in and the commitment and the 4am Wake up in the midnight go to bed, and they'll get in the gym twice or three times a day to perfect their craft. But in business, that's not okay. In business, it's not okay to encourage that hustle or to engage in that hustle. And it's a very odd dynamic, and I've never seen it called out this way. And I think we need to talk about it.

Scott Scully:

You know what I'm thinking about right now. I'm thinking about, you know, there was just a lot of news about how Elon Musk was going to what sleep on the floor, Twitter until it's fixed. Yeah. The guy has put his entire life into really changing the world, right? And then you've got LeBron James, who has also put a bunch of work in to become arguably one of the best players ever. I think Michael Jordan would wipe his ass in a hurry, but I'm on the Jordan side. Why can LeBron say whatever the hell he wants? And Elon Musk gets just mangled when Elon Musk is actually impacting the world. And LeBron is a good basketball player that carries his own opinion and what he says some of it factual, right, some of it total bullshit. Why can one say whatever he wants, and be glorified, and the other is right now, one of the more unpopular people, because of some of the moves that he's making to try to fix

Jeff Winters:

the world. Yeah, especially around work ethic. Like you hear LeBron James, or Michael Jordan, Michael Jordan famously sort of invented like popularized hustle culture, like, why do we glorify Michael Jordan and hold him on a pedestal for working so hard? And he would tell anyone who comes behind him, you got to work that hard, but yet in business, not okay

Eric Watkins:

I mean, very simply put, Isaac is a great post. This is a great way to think about it. I've never thought about it or heard about it in this analogy, but you hear it all the time. You know, everyone talks about work life balance, work life balance, no one's talking about LeBrons work life balance. They're bragging about how hard he works. And he gets glorified for it. And it gets paid off. He gets rewarded for it. So I I do think I think this is a great post. I think it's a truth.

Jeff Winters:

I think it's true. It's not fair. It's not fair. It's not right. I think the most important thing here is it's like teaching the wrong the wrong lesson. Scott, I know you'd say the same. We started these businesses. There was a lot of hustling going on. A lot.

Scott Scully:

Same kind of thing. A lot of hustle a lot of sacrifice. We love you, Isaac,

Jeff Winters:

Isaac, you are our first truth. Yeah.

Eric Watkins:

Even though Jeff said your last name wrong. We still appreciate everything. He said there.

Jeff Winters:

I try. I have another truth. And it comes from Lars Nielsen. And he said, and I'm paraphrasing. The hardest part of getting any deal any new sale is finding it. Lars Nielsen, Lars Nilsson, by the way, no slouch, he runs all of sales development for Snowflake. Been on many, many dozens of boards. I mean, the guys, I think this is a 1,000,000% Truth. The hardest part of getting any deal or winning any new customer is finding it. And I know we're a little predisposed to this because this is the world we're in Sure. But if you give me the greatest sellers in the world, with no ability or wherewithal or drive, to go schedule their own new sales meetings, or a bunch of people who will schedule sales meetings and a person who can close deals, I'll take the people that'll get the meetings and our personal close deal over a whole team of incredible sellers who won't get meetings. Every time I firmly believe this is a truth. The hardest part of getting a deal is finding it.

Scott Scully:

I agree. First of all, Lars you have a badass name.

Jeff Winters:

No, yeah, he's the man

Eric Watkins:

anything he says is immediately going to be more likely to be true.

Scott Scully:

Hopefully you're a Metallica fan, that would make the whole thing that much better. I'm sorry, to those of you that are too young to know who Metallica is I feel sad for you. Well, like you said, this is what we do. Right? If if that wasn't the case, we wouldn't be in business. If there weren't 1000s of businesses that were out there that needed help in the business development part of the sales process, then we just literally wouldn't exist. You can make up sales numbers by putting in that first business development activity. Right. It's hard to make up sales numbers by finding enough you know, elite salespeople that will actually do their own prospecting. Right? So it's truth all the way from me.

Eric Watkins:

1,000% true. And my logic behind this is if it wasn't true, then sales reps wouldn't complain about quality of leads. Do they? You know, from time to time, from time to time, but if this wasn't true, then people wouldn't complain about quality leads because it'd be so easy to close every deal that comes across your desk. Truth, Truth, Truth.

Scott Scully:

Okay. Here comes comes the lie.

Jeff Winters:

And I'm sure Brandon's a nice guy. I'm sure he is but I think this is a very important thing that we need to talk about. January is a tough month. It's cold. It's dark. post-holiday depression. I'm gonna give you stats as to why I have a problem with this. Oh,

Scott Scully:

hold on. Cool. But what is he saying?

Eric Watkins:

What's he saying? It's just hard? Does that Hard

Jeff Winters:

January's a tough month, it's cold. It's dark, post holiday depression.

Eric Watkins:

That's all it said?

Jeff Winters:

That's, that's the part that I captured. Okay. I don't want to interpret for Brandon. Not here. Here's my problem with this. First of all, it's at least in the sales world, factually inaccurate. So we schedule more sales meetings for our clients in January, than any other month of the year. The next highest month is February in March and then October, so that that's not true, factually in sales. And next, it's this idea that, Oh, you know, you can sort of let your guard down. It's January like it's okay kind of slide into the rest of the year. And the problem is that everybody budgets this way, and you get behind and I hate this, like, oh, at the end of the year, we're going to be at an amazing number but in January you know, things can be slow and then you find yourself catching your tail the whole year. January is a great month to sell. January is a great month two accounting to finance people are if your sales reps are reading this, they're gonna get the wrong message. You got to start out the year fast. Don't worry about all this other bullshit that's that's in your head. I think this is wrong.

Scott Scully:

What's the point of the post? We wrap it up with something was there like a final message or some something he was trying to pass tonight?

Jeff Winters:

Again, he's not here. But my guess is it's like, you got to work really, really hard right now to get everything going for 23 Because once you hit January, like people are hungover from the holidays. That's my read on

Scott Scully:

lie. Like you said, it's our best month ever for our clients 1000s of clients in every state across the entire country. We literally set more sales meetings in January than any other month and it's because people are making decisions. Right people are people are naturally full of budget. Right? It's January their budget is full the tank is not empty. They're making decisions to make it a little bit easier on their end to accomplish their goals. The best frickin month to sell period this guy does know what he's talking about. I'm glad that you again are out there and the Washington pasture protect in the PBN incredible.

Eric Watkins:

If you had to pick two weeks out of the year where people are the most productive? What would those weeks be? Probably right after New Year's when they're making all these resolutions. It's like there's, this is the time to get people when they're in that mindset. So that is completely false. Don't agree with it at all.

Scott Scully:

LinkedIn, shut down his account.

Eric Watkins:

But I do love. Hopefully he spreads that and a lot of our competitors listen to that make a little bit easier for us.

Jeff Winters:

January sucks for business, lie, lie, lie.

Scott Scully:

Jeff, as always, you're saving us.

Jeff Winters:

You're saving us doing my duty.

Scott Scully:

All right, next section 50 for 50. These are our top 50 Business Growth tips. Things that we know that you should implement in route to $50 million in revenue. We've been there. We've made the mistakes. But there are also some things that we got right? These are those things. If we ever started a business again from scratch, we would implement these 50 things without fail. Period. I love today's today's is all about quality. You know there are people that are listening that say hey, I have quality. I've got quality checks on my production line, right? Or maybe there are sales managers that are thinking hey, I listen to sales pitches and score those and give feedback to to our sales department. I believe in quality. I'm talking about quality in literally every position in your building. So we have an A player score, which will be highlighted in another episode. But part of that a player score is a quality score. And whether you are doing the very important work of answering the phones and being first impression to those that are calling the company or keeping the office clean and tidy so people can be productive or you're on the production line or you're selling you're an account manager. It doesn't matter. Every single person is important on the team. Every single person should have consistent quality checks. I know that that sounds weird. I know that that sounds like extra work, but you should have standard and plays, if you will, in literally every position. And if you do, your productivity is going to be greater, your people are going to play together more as a team, and you're going to have a higher chance of success. Right? You know, I think of a football team, I mentioned football just because I played it, right. And I think about how every position on the field has a part of that play. And when somebody's doing or playing their role in that individual play, then that play works, right when everybody is is tied together, doing the things that they need to do. Period. And football. Yep, position coaches, and you have positioned coaches so that they can practice, you know, and really zero in on those those individual characteristics like catching the ball or hitting the hole when you're running or blocking, whatever it may be, you need to do this in your business. I'm sold on it 100%. We do it here. It helps us be better.

Eric Watkins:

Eric, what do you think? Yeah, I think this is super important, and has been probably our little secret recipe for success. And I think the the first thing is, this is not for businesses that don't want to grow. The whole point in doing this is so we can scale our business. And you're gonna have different people coming into the business. And without repeatable processes that have proven to be effective, you're not going to be able to scale your business. And then the first thing I want to address is people are probably out there listening, saying, Well, I trust my employees, I don't want to micromanage my employees, I just want to give them a result. And I want them to hit that. And I want to go back to work, teaching you how to go from zero to 50 million, like that got us to $10 million, don't get me wrong, that did not get us to $20 million, to get to 20. To get to 30 to continue to go from there. You have to put processes in place, make sure they're happening and make sure they're repeatable, because people say, Oh, that's micromanagement. Well, micromanagement really, to me, is managing the details. And if you're a process oriented company, you need to manage the details, to be able to repeat that success. Don't confuse this with I have to be looking over your shoulder every second, this can be a positive thing. If you're running the process, how its intended. I'm giving you kudos, and we're high fiving. And it's a, it's a great time. If I have to talk to you about you not running the process, you're really micromanaging yourself, because you're making me have that conversation. And I think that some people are uncomfortable with that. But that is where your business hits that point where you just take off and you go to the next level, because you can bring new people on and they can get up to speed quickly. Because you're doing things over and over. To go

Jeff Winters:

from zero to 50 million, you have to have so much quantity, you're going to need more people, you're going to need more sales, you're going to need more marketing your nucleus of people that you've worked with, if you're an entrepreneur CEO president is going to expand and to get to 50 million, you're not going to know people. And so you've got sort of one of two choices as you start to get to scale. Choice. One is you get to some point, whatever the revenue level or number of employees is, and you look back and go, Oh my gosh, wait a minute, we're doing we're doing that that way. Whoa, no, no, we can't do that. Let's fix it. That's the reactive way. What Scott's talking about as a proactive way, which is at every stage in every area, we're going to have a really high standards. And, and I always liked this phrase, we're going to have a quality friend at the quantity party. We're gonna have a quality friend at the quantity party. And if you have a quality friend at the quantity party, you're going to proactively make sure that you don't lose the standard of whatever department facilities, sales, marketing, whoever, whatever department it is, if you have a quality friend at the quantity party, you're going to maintain your standards proactively. And because you don't know yet like as you're growing you don't know how unruly and unwieldy things can be. You cannot you can't just depend on people because you're just too big is just too too too big proactively Quality audits, quality friend quantity party.

Scott Scully:

Great points. Guest we've talked about this a lot. I'm going to make another point and we'll we'll move on when we talk about Chick fil A. And everybody's talked about how if you go through a Chick fil A drive thru, it's the same experience period. And somehow you're there's a mile long line and unlike four minutes, you're through it with friendly people and you get hot food that tastes the same in North Carolina as it does in, you know, Iowa. You can't grow and mass like that and have that many locations without having processes nailed down and quality audits and checks to make sure that standards are being met. And I think that whether you're a manufacturing business or you have software or you're a restaurant, it doesn't matter. Everybody needs to roll up into that. Everybody needs to have processes in place in unity, check that quality. And if you do, then you can be repeatable. And you know, you were hitting on something, Eric, I think that's important. I think that to where you're going, if you're going to grow, and you want and you want to add more people, you have to have that nailed down so that it's that much easier to train those new people to write, like, here's the job, here's what we expect. Here's your things we're going to peer into and look at to help coach. And then most of the time, like you said, it's an opportunity to really praise people and make them feel good about what they're doing. And that everybody wants clear expectations. What's my job? What's success? That's actually probably the biggest part of this. Right? Right. People are so damn confused. Whoa, wait a minute, what do they want me to do? Like I just had discipline, I don't understand, this nails down exactly what you want somebody doing none, it's consistent check in. So you have the opportunity to praise somebody for really good work, and show them how they roll up into the entire organization. So get those quality processes in place, and audits. And we know that you're going to be just that much more successful going forward.

Eric Watkins:

I would say the one last thing as we're talking about this, that hits home is then when you promote individuals, if you're grown as a business, you're probably promoted internally, promote people that are doing the process in the way that you want to replicate it. There will be anomalies of high performers that maybe do things a little bit in their own way. And if they're getting really good results, you probably leave it there in some cases, but that's not the person who's going to make the best leader at the next level. I think that's really important to keep these things in place.

Jeff Winters:

You really last word, and I'm on his topic there.

Scott Scully:

That's good, though. That's good. That's why we're here. Yeah,

Jeff Winters:

sure. To tell you if I had a quality

Eric Watkins:

audit for this episode. Would you call that out? And

Jeff Winters:

I'd let that man finish his topic. Last Word

Scott Scully:

is the COP is a cop all

Eric Watkins:

the way through the cop all the way through?

Scott Scully:

All right, we are now to Mining for Growth, Gold. I know a lot of you have been waiting for this. You're there, you're wanting to increase sales, and yet just want more sales meetings, and you don't necessarily know how to get them. That's why our man Eric Watkins is here to bring the heat.

Eric Watkins:

All right. I have a great one today. And it's going to be in the area of SEO. So Google runs everything. We understand that. Why do people use Google? Typically, because they have a problem or question that they want answered. So it's really been common knowledge that in order to increase your keyword rank, you need to be the best at answering people's questions. There's a variety of factors, where you're located, what your reputation is, etc. But one of the biggest things that's been tracked is bounce rate. So when someone comes to your website to get a question answered, get a problem solved. And they read it. Do they stay there? Or do they just bounce right away? And what Google is doing into 2023? It's not just about keywords alone anymore, you have to be better even better about getting that question answered. And it's a newer term called dwell time. And dwell time specifically, is the amount of time somebody spends on your website before going back to the original search. So bounce rate, they can go anywhere, but now they're tracking how often did they come to your website? And then you were so bad at answering the question or problem that they had that they went back to the original search to be able to do that. And I think simply the too long do not read version of this, is you need to write content that's really, really good at answering people's questions. So you need to think about why would they click on this topic? What question are they trying or problem are they trying to solve? And how does my content relevant to solve that problem? What do you guys think about that?

Scott Scully:

I love it. Because there are so many ways or I guess, as we go on year by year, Google gets smarter, right? But there were a lot of ways to trick Google to say I'm the most relevant resource for you in your local market. And now the fact that, sure, you could do that. But once they land, they're going to measure whether or not you actually answered the question, basically, because they went back to the search and searched for, you know, other resources. I think it's awesome. Of course, there are decision makers that want to you know, check out three or four other websites before making a decision. So it's not it's not that some you know, someone can't go back to original search because that's not necessarily a bad thing. But it is bad if they hit your website. And they're not dwelling if

Eric Watkins:

it welling, right, I love them. Love the word.

Jeff Winters:

I always thought the word dwelling referred to like the amount of time you spent on In a restaurant after you paid your bill, which should be 00, I want to I want to pay my bill before I finished my entree. But here's the way I think I think about this. And we think about this. When you're writing content, I think a lot of people write content for their site, they chalk it full of keywords, and they want to make it just interesting enough, but they don't want to give away their secret stuff, not the good stuff, we got to keep the secret stuff, you got to give away the good stuff. You have to give away your secrets and your look at this podcast. Like, we tell you everything we tell you all the secrets to the business, how many calls you got to make, how to make the calls, how we do quality audits, I mean, we tell you all the good stuff. Quick, quick interpretation, quick action, give away your secrets, people aren't gonna copy your business, it's harder than you think. Give away the good stuff, you'll answer people's questions. And people will stay on your site and Google will reward you and leave after you pay your bill

Eric Watkins:

and leave FTP. Most importantly, yeah, it's, you know, when you think about Google, they're spinning billions of dollars to figure out how to become smarter every single day. And theyre, we're under representing how good they are at tracking if you're writing relevant content to answer people's questions, but that's the problem they're trying to solve every single day. Because make some more money in the long run. Imagine that,

Scott Scully:

to try to simplify it for people that are if you actually if you're out there, and you're like me, you kind of get pissed off about SEO, because it almost seems like black magic, and everybody has a different opinion. And that's why, you know, Eric is trying to simplify it by saying, look, the only reason Google exists is you have a question or a problem, you want an answer. They wanted to build something where you could go ask the question, and they want to serve up the most relevant resource closest to that person. And they get smarter and smarter on how they do that. And this is just now you get served up. And when they get there, they want to make sure that on your website, you're doing a really good job of taking care of that person answering their question. And one way to measure that is how long they hang out before they go back and search for the same thing again. And I love it. Watch for it, put it into place.

Eric Watkins:

And honestly, it's the you know, the last, the last thing is you, you should not do this internally if you don't know what you're doing. And I'm not saying you have to use abstract. But this stuff is changing every day. And it's getting more and more complicated. And I think it's something you either bring in an expert and pay the money to bring it internally or that that's going to commit to continue to learning every day, or you get you have to outsource as part of your business. Or you'll be left in the dust

Scott Scully:

love putting into play. All right, next, now you have more leads, you gotta be able to sell them. That's why we go to Jeff, for the

Jeff Winters:

Tales from Sales, sales, Tales from Sales. You know, what I'm hearing a lot of out there, and I have forever the stuff with sales is always the same. It's crazy. It's like, Scott, you know, decades. How do I drive urgency in my sales process? How do I drive urgency in my sales process? Can I just send an email every hour checking in circling back circling the wagons checking in circling back? No, that's not how you do it. We're gonna give you a give you a way that we've we've done it here. And Scott, I know you've done this in other businesses. And it's been really successful. It's not easy to implement. But it's a simple concept. The concept is scarcity. So there's only a certain amount of something and you either have to buy or someone else will it is, is it is a finite amount. And in this particular example, we're going to use geographic exclusivity as the scarcity. Example to drive urgency. And geographic exclusivity is a business changing strategies. You can't just implement this tomorrow. But on the road from 10 to 50 million, there's probably a lot of people who are at the more of the beginning stages, and could still do this. And say we're only going to select one company in a given in this case, like I said, geography but it could be industry or it could be size or whatever it is. And it's a great way to an in a genuine fashion. Drive. urgency because either you Mr. And Mrs. Prospect are going to buy this, whatever it is this geography or this industry and we're not going to sell it to anyone else, or someone else is going to do it and I don't know who it's going to be but somebody is going to sign this contract before the other person and that person is going to to get this market or industry or all to themselves. I've, I am new to seeing this, I have seen it work it. Scarcity drives urgency, this subset of scarcity drives incredible urgency. It's, it's, it's something, it's something to see. And an interesting tactic if you're looking at your business strategy and driving urgency is something on the docket of problems to solve.

Scott Scully:

I've been part of three significant sales teams over the last 30 years. We've used it since the beginning. And we've literally had growth years year over year, every single year, if there's a way for you to do it, if you're starting a sales department, figure it out, if you're in the middle of it, figure it out. And like you said, it could be, we can only implement five new clients this month. It could be we only have room for five healthcare clients. It could be so many different things. But you've got to have something where people feel like it's a club, there's limited membership. If I don't get it, now, I'm missing out. You have to and if you do that, you will be surprised at how your close rates skyrocket and how your sales soar.

Eric Watkins:

And I would say the the one thing to make sure when you're doing this, when you're solving this, what is the scarcity going to be make it genuine, make it real, because our sales reps, you got to talk to your sales reps. They know they've lost deals, they lose deals every month, because of exclusivity and scarcity. And so when they talk about it, it's real to a client in you can't come up with something fake and it come across and it that just will fall flat.

Jeff Winters:

Prospects can feel when it's fake. Yeah. But when it's real, and it works. It's unbelievable.

Scott Scully:

With us, right? There's just so many stories of sales reps and look at we can only represent one HVAC, or mechanical contractor in this market. We're interviewing six or seven of the top folks like yourself, we're trying to close the market within two weeks. We do that that happens, like it just happened in Cleveland, it just happened in Toledo. It's going to happen here as well. We're having a good conversation, I would suggest that if you want to partner with us that we figure out how to wrap this up now because there's a couple guys next to me having conversations, the market is going to go and you know, and then people won't believe it, the prospect won't believe it. And then all of a sudden, they decide they want to do at the markets gone. So it is very real in the way that we use it. And then when that happens once or twice, then the sales rep gets even more belief around it. And they're just that much more powerful in their messaging and collecting a sale faster. I just love it.

Eric Watkins:

Good stuff. Tales from sales

Jeff Winters:

tales from sale. Look at Ohio. Close Toledo because

Eric Watkins:

some would say we're going into Milwaukee to

Scott Scully:

somewhere. Milwaukee is my favorite test market. So now we're closing, we're closing out with some fun, Eric, what do we have today

Eric Watkins:

we have to do or not to do to do or not to do and I have a great one to start us off. There's been a lot of hype going on. The USA soccer team has made it into the final 16 A lot of a lot of people didn't think we could do it. Here's the deal. They are 33. And not that we condone gambling on this show. But this is important question you need to hear it because we're trusted sources and you need to hear it from us. They are 33 to one to win the national art to win the World Cup. So for those of you who don't know how that works, you bet $10 You win $330 Did you just use a calculator? I did. I

Jeff Winters:

were you included in the for those of you who don't know,

Eric Watkins:

for those of you I was a lot of people are betting the USA they're betting with their hearts. They're not necessarily betting with their minds. But is it the popular thing do you do you put a little bit of money on the USA to make that victory so much sweeter when they end up winning the world cup? Jeff, we'll start with you.

Jeff Winters:

First of all, I don't condone gambling in any form, especially on the show or outside of the show. And there's many states where this is illegal. So for those of you in those states, you should abstain. should abstain. Is that your

Scott Scully:

is that part of your one? 800 Yes, off period. This

Eric Watkins:

is not financial advice,

Jeff Winters:

not financial. I'm not a financial advisor. My

Scott Scully:

name is Jeff. I'm addicted to gambling.

Jeff Winters:

I am not a financial advisor. But if I were and I hate to say this, and I don't want whatever's coming my way. Now you got to do it. Yes, you got to do it got to do a particular case in this It's because it's national. Now if you know, you went to northwest valley state outside of Lexington, you don't know is that your college that this is your country? If you can legally gamble, you bet on the United States of America, these colors don't run. They don't run, don't run. They run fast, actually, on the pitch to the goal. But outside of that, these colors don't.

Scott Scully:

Who are the top three favorites? Well,

Eric Watkins:

the top favorite, or I guess one of the tops, Germany's eliminated now so it's crazy this year, but I think France is number one who just lost to whoever, Tunisia or something. It's all over the map. There's no I like that's the part of the reason why you should maybe bet them doesn't matter. Who knows.

Scott Scully:

You know, there's a particular individual that I know that bets every weekend. Anything that he can bet on, I would call you're listening, you know who you are. That's right, Mike. And he's one of the like, Jeff would even Jeff even texted me and asked what Mike is betting on this weekend, because he wants to bet on the exact opposite. So you're probably going to lose your money, you can feel good about putting 10 bucks or 100 bucks on your country and that's great. Just, you might as well put it on your coffee table, watch the game, put it on your coffee table and burn it. Or, and I'm not one of those people. I know that there are ways where you can hedge your bet bet a couple of other angles, right? And make sure that you cover your losses if you will.

Eric Watkins:

Very safe right say cover your losses with

Scott Scully:

Jeff just get a six pack put a 20 in the coffee table, light it on fire, watch the game with a USA sweatshirt and call it a day mentalism.

Eric Watkins:

They're gonna win, I believe that we will win. I believe that we will win as well. And you heard it here first on the gross show. Break USA wins free money sitting out there, put it down.

Jeff Winters:

Gamble responsibly, gamble responsibly and responsibly.

Scott Scully:

Okay, well, as always, I think I said this last time. I love our first sections and when we close on not necessarily. Maybe listen to all of our sections and when you get to the do or not to do, maybe don't follow that 100% That's my disclaimer. As always, we're reminding you to be kind of grow and grind. Looking forward to next week. Signing off. Let's grow.

Jeff Winters:

Let's grow let's grow.

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