The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Season 2, Episode 3 - Get Your Ass Back Into Your Business

December 30, 2022 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Season 2, Episode 3 - Get Your Ass Back Into Your Business
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Businesses are either growing or dying right now. It's time to get back into the weeds of your business to ensure you're not one of the casualties. Staying connected can help you make better decisions, maintain healthy relationships with customers and vendors, improve customer service, and ultimately, stay relevant and ahead of the competition.

Thanks for listening!

Scott Scully:

Welcome back to the growth show. You know, guys that I was thinking over the last week, I think we are the #1 source in the planet for Business Growth tips, from zero to 50.

Eric Watkins:

The number one source the number

Scott Scully:

one source on the planet, we are ready for growth.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah, very hot right now.

Scott Scully:

You know, we've got we've established a grow nation, there's a there's an audience out there that is yearning for this advice. They just want their path to be a little bit easier. We just want to be a part of the ride. Eric, how was your last week?

Eric Watkins:

My last week was great.

Scott Scully:

Good. You got some good things to share? Oh, I've

Eric Watkins:

been digging for some growth gold. And I am excited about what I'm about to share today.

Scott Scully:

Nice. Before we get to that, as always, we get to start with Two Truths and A Lie Two Truths and A Lie from LinkedIn. Sheriff of LinkedIn Sheriff Winters, share pointers, has combed through, [self proclaimed

Eric Watkins:

Sherrif],

Scott Scully:

pasture of content,

Jeff Winters:

self proclaimed, but it's been notarized. It has been by the by the community. So

Scott Scully:

so far, you've been successful that do that sort of thing. You've put some serious content creators in cuffs, that's for sure. Did Jamal call?

Jeff Winters:

The reason we have this and that LinkedIn needs a sheriff is because at one point, LinkedIn was a place where all leaders, CEOs, managers, individual contributors could come and get great, perfect advice. And it was pristine. And now anyone can say whatever they want on LinkedIn. And we have some fun with it. But as I say, every week there's a seriousness to it, because people will take the advice they get on LinkedIn, go back to their teams go back to their jobs, go back to their companies and put it into play. And sometimes they should. And sometimes they should. And what do we call the times they shouldn't Eric, we call it two truths and a lie, liars. Let's start with the truths. It's in reference to motivation. And it comes from Johnny kinrara. I'm saying that right, Johnny. But I really liked this one in reference to motivation. There's no one size fits all, the path to feeling a certain way, looks different for everyone. And this is in reference to motivation, a leaders job is to find that path for each member of their team. Scott, you talk about this all the time, like making sure you really lean into the people know what motivates them. I think too many think that one of two things. And I've seen this recently, which is why this top of mind for me. A lot of leaders think what motivates them motivates others. Everybody should be as motivated by whatever as I am. And that is really bad. Because then you lead everyone the way you want to be led. And then you only get a team of us. And you'll have a team of us. You got a team of everybody else. And I think Johnny is spot on here the leaders job is to find the path for each member of their team. As it relates to motivation. I

Scott Scully:

It takes time. And I think that's why people don't love this. do it. Right. Again, we've talked before about the laundry list of 15 or 20 things I have to do as a manager and I get to those and I miss some of the most important things: which is knowing what why Jeff's here. What's his journey look like? What's he want to accomplish? Where's he want to end up? What's important to him? And if you know that then Jeff's a higher performer, he's happier. You're looking at me like God, I wish he would do that. Sometimes.

Eric Watkins:

You would ask me, I was you know, my

Jeff Winters:

journey. Did he? He texted me good job the other day. Got a good job. It was a two in the morning, good job, but made my day.

Scott Scully:

I save them for really important time periods,

Eric Watkins:

really important. I would agree 100%. With Johnny, I think everybody is 100% different. And I love what you said, Jeff, because every new leader struggles with this, like they get in the position and they like throw their hands up in the air. And Why won't people work as hard as I work? Well, if they did, we wouldn't have leaders. Everybody just be a bunch of individual contributors running around. Like that's how you make your money in leadership. And I would I would say the one thing I would add here is don't ask people. Hey, what motivates you? Oh, it's you never get the answer. I think that the two ways I would do it is I would draw on past experience. So I would say what is something, what's a time in your past where you've been super motivated and super fired up? And tell me about that. Like, what were some of the things you were doing? What was your leader doing? And you'll figure out like, what was it that really got them excited about that experience? And then ask them the other way, what was one time Um, we were just super demotivated, and you're kind of discouraged, and you know you were doing something and you just didn't really have a lot of purpose to it. And then you avoid that. And then I think that's a lot better way to do it than just asking someone how they're motivated. Truth, truth,

Jeff Winters:

truth. Next, I think this is from Brooks Van truth, Norman, from Brooks Van Norman, this is as topical. As it comes right now. Brooks said, I once left a company, my manager never said goodbye. Another time, I left a different company and the CEO called me. He asked how he could help and thanked me for my contribution. True leaders play the long game. I think this is topical in the world. And I think it's very important for us acutely, as of late in the world, because as we know, a lot of people changing jobs, a lot of people coming and going, and how you treat people on the way out is really important, especially for the people who are still there. But number two, it's also really important because it opens the door for people to come back. And we've had some incredible people who have left generally, like, kind of briefly to go see and explore their opportunities, and then they come back, that doesn't happen if on the way out the door. They're getting hammered, and people aren't talking to them. And that kind of thing,

Scott Scully:

I think is a truth. And, you know, we wouldn't be where we're at today without some of those pretty powerful people coming back and even share sharing with us what they've learned on the streets and other places, right? You can be a better business by having people want to come back to you at some point and sharing their new knowledge, you know, their experiences. I think that there's something that I think could be a takeaway here, one, one simple thing that you could put into play to help with this. And that's an exit interview. And a lot of people don't do it. But if you sit down and you find out what they liked, you know, what they think we should work on? Maybe some of the reasons why they're exploring another career. And and just, you know, what, what, what can we share with others, from their experience, just just have a real, nice, honest exit than I think you can. One of the ways you could leave the door open, great point.

Eric Watkins:

This is a truth. But this is a double truth, if you have a young workforce, especially ones that come to your company straight out of college, because it's the only experience that they've had. So the grass is always greener. And what we've had with a lot of what we call our boomerangs, right people coming back, is, you know, they go out there, and it's not quite what, what it was made up to be, right. And I think if you burn that bridge on the way out, then you're never going to get those people. And, you know, if you're playing the long game, you plan to be in business for a long time. You should do that.

Scott Scully:

I think I've learned here, too, right? You get, you're in the battlegrounds, everybody's working hard. You know, you you want to see people that are loyal to the business and to the customers. And sometimes you can get hurt, especially in the beginning stages of starting your business, when you're all really in the grind. And everybody knows each other intimately. And when someone's deciding to leave at that point in time, it can be a little bit more sensitive, or hurt a little bit more than when you're a little bit larger. But I think I've learned here because this isn't something that maybe I would have agreed with, right? Like they're choosing to leave that would have been 20 years ago. Me like, screw them, they left don't let him back. You know, and I feel like I'm I'm growing in this area and think thank God again, because we've got some really really good people back on the bus driving us to down roads, we couldn't have gone down without them.

Jeff Winters:

Truth, truth truth. Uh oh, this one kills me. You're looking at Scott, you're gonna hate this. So Matt says, If you hate being told what to do, you will love being an entrepreneur. No, what? What? Oh, I see. So if I don't like being told what to do. That's the qualification to be an entrepreneur.

Scott Scully:

Right? What's Matts last night?

Jeff Winters:

I can't say this. I don't say Oh, and I'm not gonna say but done that.

Scott Scully:

There's a double lie you need to say the last night because people do

Jeff Winters:

that though. They go they're sitting in their job. They go I don't like my job. I don't like having a manager. I know what I should do. I should go. I should go, take my entire livelihood and we love risk and start a business because I don't like having a boss. That's what I'll do

Scott Scully:

you know what the real lie is what? Hold on. Let me tell you, who tells you what to do. The banker, the accountant.

Jeff Winters:

Cost the employees, the customer

Scott Scully:

the market. The How about if you want to be told what to do all the Time go be an entrepreneur. Matt, you should you deserve to have your last name shared

Eric Watkins:

highs, lies. Agree. I feel like that was the first thing that came to mind is, you know, the, like people say it all the time. It's like, you know, Eric, you have so many people reporting to you like you get a, you know, you get to make all the decisions that I was like, I am constantly weighing what 1500 clients think and what 500 People think like every single day, I have 2000 direct or bosses in my opinion. And it's, it's a lot,

Jeff Winters:

becoming an entrepreneur is a wonderful thing. Yeah. And if that's what you want, there could be no better thing for me. Nothing better for you, Scott, I bet nothing better. But it is not a decision to be taken lightly at all. You have to want it so much worse than you think you need to want it because it's so much harder than you could possibly imagine if you've never done it before, and not wanting to have a boss isn't a reason to do it. And it ain't going to inspire you long term to do the work you're going to have to do.

Scott Scully:

And if that's why Matt decided to start his business, he's going to be crawling on hands and knees and whining and like a baby back to his boss real quick like, because he's going to be told what to do way more times than his boss told him what to do. And he isn't going to be paid for a long time. And he's making the ultimate sacrifice and putting a kazillion hours in. Matt, stop being a pussy.

Jeff Winters:

I got you fired up on that one. I don't like math. And that is another segment of two truths and a Lie from LinkedIn. .

Scott Scully:

You were right. By the way, thank you. Well, we might as well keep the controversy going. Because in today's 50, for 50, people, they're not gonna like this one. Get back in your business asshole. I know, you just got done reading a book, where it said work on your business, not in your business. You guys ever heard that? Before? I've heard

Jeff Winters:

that before. It's in the book, it's in every book.

Scott Scully:

And the belief is that if someone at a high level is too much in a weeds, then they can't see the forest through the trees and you just can't lead. And what I would suggest is that you don't know your business, and you're going to drive your damn business off a cliff, if you don't understand your customers, your teams, the processes they're using. I believe in the opposite. You guys know we all do this, one of my favorite stories was a number of years back when, when I was with one of our managers on a team called the pirates. And I'd kind of dropped everything dropped all my duties, to sit there with that team of incredible people, a lot of them still here. You know, we had so much fun and talk so much vision about things that we wanted to do that there are a lot of those people that are here leading our company forward, and I love it. But for 30 days, we got together. By the way, this team, although full of talent, at that particular point in time was in last place. Okay. And I got with that team. And we just talked about who they were, and where they wanted to be. And like we just owned being the number one team. And in that 30 days, I saw so much about our processes about how we were training, how our managers were motivating people, like, you know, what vision they understood versus where we were actually going. And I actually did that a couple more times. So I'd spent a good 90 days doing that on different teams. And it was my favorite time probably in our existence. And I learned a ton about that. And I know that you guys both do that. Now it's like, what I'm recommending is there is there is a point where you could be so removed that you don't have the ability to actually be the visionary. Because you don't know what's going on. You don't understand where the business is at today. You don't understand the changes in the market, what your customers want. You know how the climate has changed. I'm saying Get back in your business, sit and sit on the production line. Call customers, be an account manager, do some sales presentations, build a list? Get on the roof, right? Fix a computer, whatever it is that you do, do it and do it often. Get back in your business. Controversial and I know a lot of people don't believe it. A lot of

Jeff Winters:

people don't believe it. And I think a reason a lot of people who might believe it, don't want to believe it. And make excuses not to do it is because they've become a leader. I become a leader above it. And leadership is so fun, I get to have meetings. And then I have some time to think, whiteboard strategy, they do so much strategy. As a leader, I love strategy. Without the people without the people, I do it by myself, I do the strategy I get to read, I get to think that does, that does sound good. There's only one small problem. If you spend your days that way, you get way disconnected from the business. And it's, by the way, it's hard. Because you don't want to go back and pick up a number and be accountable to it. Like you hold your people accountable. You don't want to hear the unhappy customers with your product or service, or the product or service that your team is leading or managing. That's hard. That's icky. And it sucks. And that's why you got to do it.

Eric Watkins:

I think as you move up into an organization and your organization scales and gets bigger, the word that is most important is velocity, you have to be able to move a company in a direction quickly. And the number one enemy of that is credibility. If people don't feel like you're credible, if people don't feel like you really know what's going on, they're going to resist change, they're going to move even slower than they would otherwise. And like it Scott, in your situation, what you were able to do is like, Okay, I went on the floor, I saw it, I did it better than anybody else. Here's what I saw, here's what we should do. There's no questions. It's like, Alright, let's do it. Let's go forward, I saw it work, let's make it happen. Versus oh, let's sit in the office. And let's think about this. Let's really make sure we're making the right decision. Or back when I did it. However, many years ago, like this is what we did. Well, it's different. So it's like being on the ground floor is super important.

Scott Scully:

One of my favorite stories. I know that Eric likes me to bring this up, but I do a lot is when he went into the partner sales manager role, where he was leading a bunch of SDRs. And he came out of an operational position. And he hadn't been on the phone yet. But he immediately got on the phone, made fun of himself sucked for a while was really bad. But they loved it. They didn't even care that he was bad. They they loved that he would actually do it with them. Right in there in the trenches. Well, and as you would imagine, he very quickly became very good at it. Right? Which that which then even led to more credibility. But that doesn't happen. He doesn't go on that team and that specific example and just run it having never done it having a lack of understanding in, in how to run the team, how to make the calls, how to overcome objections, all that stuff that he got in there and worked through, then he could he could help the team. I think, you know, the military is a perfect example of that. Right? There are. I don't know if there's a stronger team, right. And these people are at war, and they have a leader in the trenches with them. And that person is not like, hey, jump out of the foxhole and go like attack, like they're in it with them doing it with them. This is just as important.

Eric Watkins:

I think the key word here and you use Spark this until that story is like vulnerability, like the reason people don't do this is probably because they don't want to make a fool out of themselves. Right? Like, I'm the CEO. I'm the president. I'm the VP. I like what if I go there, and I can't make a cold call or can't do whatever, like, who cares, they don't care if you're good at it, they care that you're in there with them, seeing what they're going through.

Jeff Winters:

And I share a real life example this, this happened to me unfortunately, last week, unfortunately, slash unfortunately. So I recently took over a sales team. And part of the sales team's job is to self source some deals, so to call and get their own appointments. And I the first I think it's my second day, I said give me the headset, I'll get an appointment. Immediately this guy, you know, pushes the button and the ring and I go Please don't pick up Mary Blum and I gave her the spiel. And I'm like getting through it and everyone is looking at me, I'm like, I got the headset on. I'm uncomfortable sweating. And she gives me an objection and I fold like a chair. Okay, sounds good. Talk to you later. And like, and I look up and they're all like, What the hell was that? Where did you learn how to do that? I was like, oh, and and you know, we kidded about it and they're like, get out this and that we I could have definitely done it differently. But afterwards, three, four of them came up to me like Hey, I know that was stupid and like whatever. Um, so that was so cool. You did that like that you would do that, that you would pick up the phone and make yourself source dial make a cold call as awesome. Thanks for doing that. That's what matters. Not that I've been. Yeah, no Mary's objection.

Eric Watkins:

Right, I did the same thing after you told me that story is funny. I was in a PPM training, who are best cold callers in the building. And I'm going through a mock intro. And I was trying to tell them of like how to take this new approach. And I just blanked it was like, Well, shit, I completely forgot what I was about to tell you give me a second here that I had to pause for a little bit, and then it came to me. But I think they like they want you to be human. They don't want you to be like, ya know, some invincible person

Scott Scully:

that don't ask somebody to do something that you won't do. Yep. Period. And a story. Again, this is another one of those 50 things. Yeah, like if we started again, we'd be in the weeds, I guess, quote, unquote, but we'd never get out of the weeds at some level, because you always have to understand what's going on. Next topic, remind them for some more gold ore

Eric Watkins:

mining for some growth gold. So this topic is going to be around SEO is going to be around SEO on your website. And this topic specifically is about the importance and investing in local search. So many of your competitors are already doing this, which is putting them one step ahead of you by default, they get customers that you miss out on because in today's world, it doesn't matter how good your businesses, if they can't find you, it just doesn't matter. That's why SEO and website is so important. So to test this, all of you should go and you should search your service and your metro area. So we would search marketing in St. Louis. Now we're nationwide, so not as applicable. But for some of you who serve a certain area, it in Knoxville, for example. If you're not on the first page, you are missing business today. Today, today, you are missing business. And why this is also so important. Is Google. This day and age, a lot of people are looking on mobile, everybody's not on their computer, and mobile prioritizes. Local search first. Pretty simple. So what do you need to do? You're out there, you're like, Okay, that makes sense. I looked at I looked this up, we're not doing well, what should I do? First of all, you need to have a verified Google My Business page, got to have a verified page. Second, you need five, at least five solid reviews of your business. And then this is a big part that people overlook is unique consistency and how your business shows up by name, phone number, address, and URL and how you appear on those local listings and directories. Yeah, and directories like like just those simple steps. If you're not maximizing your potential there, you are missing out on business, someone in your market right now is looking for your services and can't find you.

Jeff Winters:

I remember it clears day when somebody from our marketing team, you know, we're going to get quite a few websites here. And someone told him I felt like such a fool said why are we not coming up for Google Marketing in St. Louis. He said, It's because your address is different. All over the web are wack we moved a couple of times we didn't have consistency. And that was the that was the thing that did I'm so bought into this, this is this is a absolutely must do drop whatever you're doing, do it today. It's an easy fix. simple fix, not easy. Not easy, but you got to do it, especially if you're predominantly a local vendor. Oh, you're servicing a metro and this is table stakes.

Scott Scully:

This is the first step in your SEO strategy. Then you can create a bunch of content and in grow your keywords with other strategies paid or organic content but you got to get your local, accurate. And if you don't know how to do it, you can google how to do it. Or, or get a partner there's, you know, multiple companies in your local market that should be able to help you with this. And these tips are getting more leads. They're sitting for front of more prospects. How about some stories from sales

Jeff Winters:

tales? From say, tale or from sales gives you the alliteration, but tales from sales gives you the rhyme. There you go. You're you know what rhymes are? There's simple rhymes are simple. Children love rhymes, because they're simple and they're fun. So I'm gonna give you a tip today. Just do this today. This is the easiest tip you're ever going to hear on any relevant business Show podcast. This is it for your sales team. And it goes along with Scott's get out of your office. Get off yourself for your sales team. If you add just another person to a sales call. The data suggests if you've more than one person, seller plus another person at your company didn't even really matter who it is. your win rate goes Up to 250% Plus, wow, just by having one other person on the call, your win rate goes up 250% plus. And you could sit here go, of course it does. But you know what, that's not happening. And you know why? Because sales directors and sales managers and sales VPS don't want to do it. They don't want to get back into the business and beyond sales calls, because they used to be on sales calls, because they were a sales rep. And now they're a sales manager. And they can listen to call recordings and tell people how to be better on sales calls. Stop doing that. If you're a CEO, if you're a head of sales, if you're a sales manager, heck, if you're a really talented rep, be on more calls, with other sales reps, or with sales reps, period, it will completely change your sales number, your sales productivity, it is a huge winner, we've gone to this, specifically very recently, where our sales VPS, we've given them fewer reps, and therefore they have more time to be what we call rikes should say what is called the second voice. So they'll go second voice a call. Our close rates are up 30% since we started this strategy, 30% Because but not exclusively, but in my opinion, has a lot to do with it. Second voice calls the data as a winner 250% increase in win rates, you could do it today, go have people on the sales calls,

Scott Scully:

right? No matter who number two is, it's so much easier to to be there and not be the one leading the meeting and read the person and hear things that the person steering is not hearing all the time. I plus you have a lot of times different personalities, maybe one person connects to the prospect in a more powerful way than you do. There's just so many reasons. But you can if you're not the one leading the sales presentation, you can just evaluate and hear a lot of things that that are going to be pretty powerful to close when you agree. I mean,

Jeff Winters:

oh my gosh. Yes. And Scott, I mean, you've talked about this before, but just touch on it briefly. Not before, but you've talked to me about it, especially with new sales reps.

Scott Scully:

Yeah. That well, they're so hell bent on getting a message out. Right? And when do I ask a question? Or what probing questions do I ask? They're not confident enough yet to sit in the pocket, and really, truly listen, and see what is going on here? What is going on. And if another person's on the call there, they're gonna catch something that that new rep would have just blown right past.

Eric Watkins:

I love that I use like the football analogy, like when a new rep starts like they're running the play, right? But the the experience reps or the VP or whatever, they're reading the defense, like they're actually seeing what's going on. And then, you know, and I think I like we made these calls, like when I had sales before you transitioned over, I'd get on a call at the end of a month, and I'd talk to a prospect. And I talked to the sales rep. I'd say the same damn thing they said, right, I'm just repeating what they said. They're like, it's crazy how you say the same thing. I just told them and then all of a sudden, it's like, oh, yeah, that makes sense. Yeah, it's just, it's just you're different. It's a different person. It's just that carries a lot of weight.

Jeff Winters:

Easy, winner, easy tip. Do it today,

Eric Watkins:

do it today. I like that. That's, that's pretty easy to put into action as well.

Scott Scully:

Closed, your increase your close rates by 250%. Today by adding another person to your call.

Eric Watkins:

Alright, it's time to wrap it up with to do or not to do? And that is the question. And that is the question. So this one, you know, this is controversial as well. We've had a very controversial episode. I figured I'd just stay with that theme today. Good. The question I have for you too. Today is Do you or do you not die it during the holidays? Now hear me out here? Hear me out here? The easy answer is just let yourself go. It's the holidays, enjoy that Thanksgiving meal and just carry that over into Christmas and go up a couple pant sizes? Or it's like do I get in shape for that little early vacation I have in 2023 Or do I get a jumpstart on my New Year's resolution? Jeff, we'll start with you man. What do you think and Scott

Jeff Winters:

start? Oh,

Eric Watkins:

God. All right, Scott.

Scott Scully:

I'm very I got so many things to say first of all, dieters a salad with all the dressing in the ship.

Eric Watkins:

So you're looking at chess is very personally looking at worst.

Scott Scully:

You might as well go have a Big Mac. Okay. So many things that you are eating on your quote unquote diet are worse for you than the slice of pizza. I believe that you could have an incredible turkey dinner, or, or great things during the holidays, if you do it in moderation. I, I hate dieting, I could absolutely lose 10 or 15 pounds. But I am pretty consistent with what my weight is be more consistent all year long, all year long. It's like a salesperson trying to hit their sales quota at the end of the year. It's like, do the right things all year, like daily, weekly, all year. You know, get the right amount of sleep, drink water, eat the right things workout, and then you're not gonna have to worry about the holidays. If you're, you know, sitting here right now, which I guess a lot of us are having a few extra pounds. Just enjoy all the things during the holidays. Just maybe don't have three plates of it. Three plates, but don't go eat salads during the best time of year to shut down some incredible food and stop with the soup during Thanksgiving.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah, that's one way to look at it. I choose. I choose to look at it differently. I Scott lives life in moderation. That's great. I do extremes. I'm extreme guy. I like extreme happiness. And then I will absolutely be starved myself for a week. So here's the way I look at it is a hard is a hard period for me. The period between family pictures, and New Years is tough. That's that's where I really struggle. From a diet perspective. Here's my recommendation. And this is important. I I think the best time not a good time, this is the best time to start your fitness regimen, your diet, whatever it is, day after Thanksgiving, day after they let it go. Because if you're an extreme person, Scott would say you do it the same way all year. Yeah, fine, then that's great if that's your thing, but if you're like me, if you're McDonald's or soup cleanses the way you approach this and you need to listen hard. The way you approach this is you let it go from family pictures or if you're the end of summer, whatever is your marker there, to Thanksgiving, and then after Thanksgiving. And it's hard. But if you want to live life in extremes, it's going to be hard. You got to do what other people won't. So you can do what other people can't. Other people won't die during and get your fitness regimen going in December. Do it. So you can eat like a maniac and not exercise between family pictures or end of summer and thanksgiving. That's the advice. I like it. I like it. I like you

Scott Scully:

should eat till you can't button your pants and then eat soup for two months after that and be more miserable for the 30 minutes of being satisfied. That's great. That's great advice. I'm glad we're given good advice. Yeah, the audience that's

Eric Watkins:

what you do. Here's what I'll say you, you absolutely. You can't skip Thanksgiving, no, no one can skip Thanksgiving and you got to you can't not eat a lot on Thanksgiving. You got to eat yourself to sleep. That's the rule holidays, sleep it off sleep about 15 hours, it'll offset some of what you ate. But I would say a cheat code. Here's the other thing outside of the holidays, there's nothing going on this time of the year perfect time to diet perfect time to like not be out, etc. Like go to the gym, you don't have to be drinking or whatever it is like you don't have a bunch of parties etc. I would schedule a vacation early January a little beach vacation give you a little sense of motivation gets you through the holidays. It's a little cheat code for you out there. Give you a little something spring.

Scott Scully:

I like that yeah, the only tweak I would put on that is have a beach vacation once a quarter once a quarter there we go so that you have to continue to be not a fat s that's fair. I'm not looking at you saying you're fat so

Eric Watkins:

you did look at him when you set up for

Jeff Winters:

wrist and see on eating and fitness is for the birds

Scott Scully:

and your salads should be replaced with a Big Mac

Eric Watkins:

Caesar salad extra dressing bacon great. Okay, so ultimately it was it was too against one to do diet during the holidays. Definitely, definitely. But thank you Scott for your opinion.

Scott Scully:

Sorry, to the grown nation to the the gross shins sometimes. Sometimes we don't always agree. Hopefully you pulled some excellence from this episode. We're enjoying the hell out of the season. This

Eric Watkins:

is fun, good season.

Scott Scully:

As always, follow share, subscribe, tell everybody about it. We're just trying to help you from zero to 50 make the journey a little bit

Jeff Winters:

easier let's grow let's grow let's grow the Grow show was sponsored by abstract cloud solutions certified Salesforce consulting services

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