The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Season 2, Episode 2 - Give the Gift of High Expectations

December 19, 2022 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins Season 2 Episode 2
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Season 2, Episode 2 - Give the Gift of High Expectations
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We explore the benefits of having high expectations for your team and how it can help drive a culture of excellence and accountability.

Thanks for listening!

Scott Scully:

Welcome back to The Grow Show. I'm with my co-hosts, Jeff winters.

Jeff Winters:

Hey, everybody. Welcome back.

Scott Scully:

Eric Watkins,

Eric Watkins:

Episode Two, Season Two, Episode Two.

Scott Scully:

My name is Scott Scully, and we are bringing the heat and your route from zero to 50 million. Stories from the front lines, actionable advice, plus we're having a little fun, aren't we? Yeah, we are. New format this season. I thought the first episode went great. First one went great. But I think we've got an even better episode today. I think so

Jeff Winters:

to be hard to do. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

And you know what I love we get to get it started with Two Truths, and a Lie from LinkedIn. To truths

Eric Watkins:

and a Lie. What's your intro to this?

Jeff Winters:

That if it ain't that I don't know what it is.

Scott Scully:

It's gonna be on a recording.

Jeff Winters:

Really liked that intro to truth and a lie from LinkedIn. First time listeners, longtime listeners, a reminder, what we're doing here is we're going on LinkedIn. What used to be this pristine Bastion, this untouched garden of incredible, accurate, don't even question it business advice, has now grown some weeds. And we are here to differentiate what is truth and what is not. And so today, as always, we're going to start with our two truths that we saw on LinkedIn. The first, and I love this one from Abby Johnston, Abby says, it makes sense and it's also counterintuitive, parenthesis, at least to me, me being me that we are most effective at driving improvement with our teams. By focusing on the positives, this is all about recognition, and the importance of recognition with our teams and how important it is. Episode One Scott did his 50 for 50 tip on mandating recognition. Abby's talking about it. We love Abby, we believe in this advice, don't we?

Scott Scully:

I am not always good at this. I'm admitting that. But I could not agree with Abby more lead with something positive, right. And I just feel like you're building equity. Right? You're noticing all the things that that somebody is doing? You know, that are right, which then gives you kind of the relationship and the trust to be able to talk to somebody about the things that need to work on. It's a truth to me.

Jeff Winters:

It's a truth to me to an Eric. Like, I think an interesting part of this comment is she's right. It is counterintuitive, because typically, as leaders were given constructive criticism. You think the truth?

Eric Watkins:

I think it's true with a caveat. Okay. So first off, the word that comes to mind is momentum. What is in leadership, I feel like the most important thing you can do for people, if they're working towards a goal or vision, is give them a sense of momentum or point out where they are gaining momentum. A lot of times what we do to a fault is like, Hey, you're doing really good at this, Jeff. But you're doing these 12 things wrong. And I think the key word here with my caveat would be is using the word and so Hey, Jeff, you're doing really good at this section, two truths and a lie. And if you just made this small tweak, you could even take it to this level, and I'm building that momentum of constant improvement but I love it.

Jeff Winters:

Abby Johnston, love truth, truth. Nice job. Very nice job. Um, this is everybody's gonna agree with this, I think But Scott, yeah, this is gonna resonate with you. This is a truth of early entrepreneurship, actually versus early entrepreneurship, what people think it is. This is from I hope I'm getting this name right Xena serif, cancer scientist and founder. She says, I'm spending my morning collecting invoices for my accountant. I swear, building a company makes you grow up too fast. Guess what my next hire will be and let's keep it a secret. I absolutely love this. All the founders who are listening to this know exactly what Xena is talking about. Entrepreneurship is not this. It's not three cocktail lunches. It's not leaving work whenever you want. It's not all of this fun and glory. There's a lot of it that spending your morning collecting invoices to give to your accountant and waiting to hire that bookkeeper. I think this is a truth with a capital T.

Scott Scully:

Truth capital. T. Xena's talking about something super important, but I hope the person that she's on the road to hiring is actually a salesperson I hope she keeps doing the invoices for a while and goes and generates revenue first, but I couldn't agree with her statement more. It's

Eric Watkins:

a truth. It's a truth. Truth. I mean, I didn't start my own company. But I think just in all the stories and sharing with you all, there's just like, it's just not all what it's made up to be. And obviously, it's paid off. But people see the glory and they don't see the hours and hours and pain and suffering that we went through to get to this point.

Jeff Winters:

It was the most painful part of my entrepreneurship journey is like getting people invoiced that was so counter to who I am as a human who was like, months late the account be like, did you guys generate any revenue this year? I was like, Yeah, of course. Where are the invoices?

Scott Scully:

Revenue and Jeff scenario, but the invoices did not make

Jeff Winters:

that happen. So a truth with a capital T. And now, unfortunately, on earth, a non truth or what some might call a lie, a lie, a lie. It's a lie. And this one is this is a vicious lie. Thank you need to take this seriously. It's a little bit of a long read. But it's worth it.

Scott Scully:

We need color lawyers,

Jeff Winters:

Jamal. Jamal said this. There is a toxic idea in b2b sales, which has been around for ages. And it's ruining the lives of sellers everywhere. And that toxic idea is that, quote, sales is a numbers game. The more emails calls, demos and meetings you produce, the more successful you will be. This is absolute BS. Sales is an impact game. Only high quality sales activity, move the needle. So take the time to research your audience before reaching out to them. Dig deeper into your customers business reality before demoing, help resolve messy customer experience issues before asking for the renewal. because sales is an impact game, not a numbers game. Okay, so what is Jamal do I don't know is Jamal. I'm sure Jamal is a nice

Scott Scully:

Number of episodes back when I said I don't like guy. bad salespeople. Oh, no. Jamal might be one of those people. Look, half truth, half lie. Of course, it's an impact game, but who's doing all that damn work that he's talking about before that, who's making the calls, sending the emails, cleansing the data, figuring things out to determine, yes, this is a business that I want to talk to. And they're qualified. There's a lot of heavy lifting and a lot of work that goes into landing on somebody that makes sense to talk to and, you know, everybody wants another piece of software or the perfect data and it doesn't exist, because if it did, we wouldn't be in business.

Jeff Winters:

I think the the lie here to me comes down to and Scott I agree with you is that if you as a business have the most impactful. I mean, like think of the most in the history of the universe, one sales activity, and one sales call, and one close deal, but boy, it is so impactful, it was the best it was the best, you're still only going to get some amount of revenue. And so there's at the end of that little rainbow of impact, you're gonna have to do that some number of times to generate enough revenue to grow and sustain your business. So it becomes a numbers game even your impact game becomes a numbers game and if you spout off and people start just choosing impact over numbers and sales, then we're going to have a lot of companies that aren't grown you have

Scott Scully:

a really good one really good sales conversation among and you're gonna grow

Eric Watkins:

if it's not a numbers game, it's a numbers game because you only have to fill four

Jeff Winters:

so that is today's due truths and a lie from LinkedIn. It's a lie.

Scott Scully:

I feel like when it gets super sensitive you're gonna decide to leave the person's last name out of it.

Jeff Winters:

I am already doing that on the negative on the on the lies

Scott Scully:

are you afraid he'll come after you

Jeff Winters:

know I just want to be you know, everybody's doing their best and trying our job

Eric Watkins:

is to just share it he's just the sheriff. You just got to

Jeff Winters:

just do what my job it's

Eric Watkins:

got a political position to keep them put them in jail.

Jeff Winters:

Just doing my job.

Scott Scully:

It's it you have to be responsible and put good content on LinkedIn. That's why you are the Content Cop. However, in your description today, I felt like you were a Have a farmer in the pastures taking out the weeds.

Jeff Winters:

Take it out the weeds. Yeah, every every week, you're gonna get a new analogy. This week, I'm a botanist. big promise. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

Okay, we're gonna get into our next 50 for 50. Again, 50 business growth tips, this section is is the 50 things that we think that you ought to do, no matter what, to make sure that your path is a smoother one. We're on the second tip for the year. Again, I think this is going to be a sensitive one. Because, you know, kind of ties into what we're talking about from, from an accountant bility standpoint feel like, accountability is at an all time low in business today. And my section is about giving people to gift of high expectations. I love my man, Nick Saban, I would suggest that there are a lot of times people don't like playing at Alabama. But you know what they like, we're in the championship ring playing in the NFL, or all the other things they're probably doing in life, because he held them accountable to being the best human being performing at the highest level that that person can period. They may be running charities, leading a business, they may be a top salesperson, they're playing in the NFL, they're coaching at a high level, because he said, at Alabama, we're a number one program, this is how we do it. If you don't give me your best, you don't get to be on the team period and a story. And I think that this is a mistake that we make in business. Like we hire people, and we give them a little bit too much leeway in performance. And this could even be they're performing pretty good right? There. They're doing okay, they're getting by, but you know that this is a person that you brought in to take you to the next level. And that's not what they're doing. And most people don't, maybe they don't have the patience, or they don't know how to do it, or or they maybe they don't think it's as important as it actually is to sit that person down and say, you know, Eric, I think that you're doing some really good things. I remember when you came in. And I told you that I think that you were that guy that could actually take us to the next level. Although you're doing some really good things, I think that if you added X, Y and Z, you could improve even more. What do you think, but we don't do that. You know, because we get too busy. And if someone's status quo, or checking the box or doing the job, we don't go and try to push them to their next level. We try to do that a lot around here. And it's uncomfortable, and people don't always love it. But how many stories do we have of people that are doing amazing things here and out there in the world? Because we did say we want your best all the time and of story period.

Eric Watkins:

I've stolen this page from your book growing up under your leadership. It's something that has kind of like come naturally to me when I lead my team as well. And I think the most common mistake that I see, especially like young leaders starting out why do people get into leadership, oftentimes, it's not money or whatever, they would have gone into sales or done something else. They got into leadership, because they want to help people, and you want to help people. And ultimately, if you want to help people you want to be liked. So then they get into the leadership position. And the first thing they want to do is like, how can I make my team like me as much as possible. And I see people making the mistake of growing towards each other, instead of growing with each other. Like we're going to this new level. And I remember Scott sent me that one time. And it was probably early on when I was reporting to you. And you were just like, hey, here's the deal. I like you, I believe in you. I think you're capable of a ton. I'm going to help you get there, you're not going to like me all the times on the way there. But someday you're gonna look back, and you're gonna be thankful for this experience. And you're gonna be thankful for how hard I was on you along the way. And already, like it's already true. And I think as a leader, you look back on the people you impacted. Do you want to look back and be like, I hope they all really liked me and think I was really nice, or do you want to literally have their lives in a different spot than they would have been? Otherwise?

Scott Scully:

I had two goofy scenarios and I know I've said them both before in my life early on as a kid. One was mowing the yard. No matter what I did. My dad got home, told me to come out in the yard and pointed something out that I didn't do. Right I missed a sliver of grass. I didn't trim around one tree and he pulled me out there and like you're capable of doing better if you're going to do something, do it right. Do it at the high This level. And another thing is I'll never forget it. I was working for an HVAC company. And it was you know, my boss didn't have a project for me that day. So it was raining out. And I was in the garage cleaning one of the work trucks, it was a white work truck, there was tar all over the bottom, you know, by the wheels and by the bumpers. And then he gave me this special cleaner, scrubbing, just like really working at it. And I actually got a lot of the tar off. I mean, I'm like, I'm dripping. And he came in on multiple occasions. He's like, Man, I thought you, like were a hard worker, I thought like, you could actually get this truck, way cleaner than this, like keep scrubbing, like put a little muscle into it. He did that throughout the whole day first, because he was nice enough, like I was working there, he could have sent me home and not paid me right. So he made me clean the damage for 810 hours. But then at the end of the day, he came back and said man that trucks never looked so clean, I just wanted to show you that if you put even more into it that you could do an even better job and get even better product. And it was like one of those, I don't know one of those Karate Kid Miyagi, some things. But I'll never, ever forget that one day, and he was right. It was hard. But the truck looked a lot better. And I just learned an important lesson that I try to live by. And you have to expect the most out of your people almost to an uncomfortable level. And if you are best friends with everybody on your team, you're not doing it right.

Jeff Winters:

No, you're not to give everyone a frame of reference. I love those stories. By the way.

Scott Scully:

It's my goofy childhood,

Jeff Winters:

to give everyone a frame of reference. And Eric sort of borrowed this from me like, as a leader, you have many jobs. And when I tell my team is one of your jobs as a leader, is to get as much out of each person on your team, as their mother thought they were capable of you have not failed, unless you have you failed if you haven't done that. And there's lots of different ways to do it. There's lots of different recipes for each individual, based on who they are. But one thing that is consistent in every recipe for every individual is if you want to get as much out of them as their mother thought they were capable of, then you must hold them accountable. It is a gift to hold them accountable. You feel like just that little change of a word, that turn of a phrase, if you feel that's your mission as a leader, to get as much out of someone as their mother thought they were capable of that's your responsibility that the world has handed you. You look at them and you look at work and you look at leading them, differently, I would try to incorporate that if you can, as a frame of reference.

Eric Watkins:

I like that. I think ultimately it comes down to you're doing them a disservice. If you're not doing this, you're you're going to like I don't know if it's today, this month, next month, a year from now, five years from now, you are shortchanging them of what they could do with their lives overall.

Scott Scully:

Nice. All right. It is now time to go mining for growth, gold

Eric Watkins:

mining for growth. Go get your shovels out, do you get your shovels, I got my shovel out, I got my pickaxe, I've been mining and mining for this growth gold. And this is a good one. And it's simple. And I bet a lot of people overlook it. We're talking about email today. And when you hear about email, you hear, personalize, you got to personalize. And when they say that typically they're talking about personas and the person that you're talking to, which I agree with. And that's impactful. But the biggest tip that I have for you today is mentioning something local in the emails that you're sending. It's very simple. It sounds basic, but a lot of people don't do it. And this is a way to personalize without the creepy personalization. Without like, I Know What You Did Last Summer. So I'm going to put it in the email. And we looked across all of our, all of our email sequences and campaigns, what we're doing and we looked at all the things that we had in common, and in our top five sequences that we were running. Every one of them had something local going on in the email, and I have a great example. I'm driving into work today. I haven't stared at a billboard. Probably ever, but for some reason I noticed this today. T Mobile said, Hey, in St. Clair, we now service all of St. Clair County. I have never paid any attention to a T mobile ad ever. But the fact that they had my county that I lived in on that side, it got my attention and our inboxes are a lot like billboards. We see a lot of messages every single day. And the localization is the key. Is it the easy way really easy way to get the attention.

Jeff Winters:

I love

Scott Scully:

you're kind of a contractor of this give us a little heat.

Jeff Winters:

We stumbled on this. And it was, I think the campaign that we stumbled upon it years ago was something that I was like Keep Austin weird was like saying in Austin, and we were working with a staffing firm. And I remember writing this was years ago, when I was writing the emails for all the clients. I said, you know, what if we sent out emails to prospects in Austin, saying that we were the staffing firm that was going to help you fill your positions and Keep Austin weird, flew off the shelf, it flew off the shelf. I think there's a lot of talk about personalization, meaning in an email, I'm going to talk about your kid's name your dog's name, what's bored you like I'm gonna do a ton of research and spent a lot of time it doesn't do it for me and I don't like it. But people connect you don't feel like up a people connect to where they live period. And I know given remote work, it can be tough to find, but just look suspend disbelief on this. People connect to where they live. Number one, there's different levels of pride based on whichever city you're in. But like people connect to like interesting things about where they are not the weather, like something fun or kitschy or different or interesting. That's number one. But point number two and probably more important when you're sending in a sales email. Job Number one, don't make it seem like a sales email, like make it seem like it was sent by a person to another person. Connecting with something local is an easy way to do that. Keep Austin weird, perfect example. Good. This is a home run tip.

Scott Scully:

I love it. All right. Well, now that Austin is weird, and the businesses there have a ton more leads, what sales tips to warehouse,

Jeff Winters:

this is a sales tip mixed with disagreement. So everywhere I look in sales, in terms of tips, it just seems like all of the experts and all the consultants are focused from a sales perspective on what you call the discovery portion of the sales call, which is the portion of the sales call where the salesperson asks questions, often in an like a trite, bad way to try to uncover the need of a prospect so that they can then leverage that need throughout the sales call and sales process. gave me an example. Scott Angeles just say for the sake of example, I I'm a plow company so during the winter, I ensure that your corporate parking lot is no snow on it when it when it snows. And I know that people in Southern California are gonna relate to this. So Scott, you know, what would your I know you have a business and you have 500 people like, I bet that when it snows you probably need those people to park still right? Yeah, I need them to park. Yeah. Well, and if if there's snow in the parking lot, that probably makes it pretty, pretty difficult to Okay. It makes it difficult, like okay, all right, fine. Yes, we will get ultimately we'll get to the point where I will say, yes, if there's too much snow in the parking lot, I have a problem works disrupted, it's a pain in the ass. You've got me, okay. And that portion of the call is pretty important. Let me tell you, what's way more important to me. The tone that the sales rep uses throughout the sales call, particularly asking questions and at the end of the call, because if sales reps spent 1/10, as much time working on their tone and not sounding salesy, as they did working on the discovery questions that they asked which, by the way, hot take, most business owners hate after three of them, if they're annoying, we know what you're doing. Stop it. I guess you have to have some information. But like, Don't go overboard. And like the consultant world has now gone way overboard with 57 discovery questions and we all hate it, we've muted you, we've muted ourselves, we're doing something else. Work on your tone, because that's the key. The key to your sales call is not raising sales, resistance not increased, not not making prospects that are being sold. And you do that through your tone. You do that through not going to salesperson voice not having commission breath, being relaxed, asking questions as a human quick example, and then we'll move on. In today's world, we all know that there are a lot of decision makers in a sales process. So often when we're all on sales calls, you're talking to someone and then they have to go take that information to someone else to get the deal done. Here's an example of bad Tom. Yeah, Jeff, you know, I I have to go talk to my partner Scott. Scott's really involved in the decision and then we'll, we'll figure it out, but I'm really interested. Okay, great. Well, what's God gonna think of this? Well, I think you know, Scott's probably gonna like well, how do you know he's gonna like it? Well, I think he's gonna like it because he likes stuff like this. Okay, well, what do you think you've got to make the call on this one? I don't know, Jeff, you know, you and I just met 18 minutes ago, so I don't have a timeframe from versus This, take this. Here's the prospect. You know, I got a partner, Scott and Scott's involved in this. Yeah, no, I totally get that. And I knows, in this world, we've all got partners and bosses and I got bosses and partners and totally get it. But do you think that Sky's something that Scott's going to be excited about? Yeah. Oh, that's cool. Why? Well, Scott, see here the difference in that town. That's a different sales call, I'm getting the same information. But it's a completely different sales call, don't work on Discovery, work on tone, gold,

Eric Watkins:

gold. I have an example two, I just did a I've done two recent sales presentations for software that will not be named. And I had two different experiences. Well, like being in sales, like I know, I know, discovery. So every time they get to discovery to your point, I'm like, Hey, don't discover me, here's what you need to know. Like, here. Here's what you need to know. And the one rep was like, oh, man, I get it. You know, you get it. Like you've you've been around, you obviously know, sales. He's like, let me if I asked you a question that's off base, let me know, I'm going to try to I'll probably ask a couple here and there to get a feel for it. But if I'm off base, let me know. The other one was completely like, Okay, I'm gonna go into the list of questions that I'm used to ask. And then like a serious tone. And it's just it completely changed the the trajectory of the call. The other call the bad call, I'm like, how quickly can I get off this? So I'm, I'm lying to him. I'm telling him whatever I can do, like, yeah, I got a partner that's in Alaska that's like, No, I'm just trying to get off that call. And the other one, I'm like, is this a human being that I'm talking to? Yep. So I couldn't agree more.

Scott Scully:

I'm not buying from somebody that isn't enthusiastic about what they're selling. And that can be done because someone has the natural personality to sound enthusiastic, or that can be done with words, right. Like, I'm excited, because that's who they are. Or, gosh, I'm really excited to talk to you today, Jeff, because I know that you've got a huge lot with lots of employees, and we're coming up on the winter. And there's gonna be a lot of snow, a lot of snow projected, and I just want your people to have a place to park.

Jeff Winters:

That tone is so much better than what you owe it, you know? Yeah. And I think I think what anyone that's the right there's no I'm not listening to that going. Oh, my, I've got my now I'm feeling sales pressure immediately when I seals feel sales pressure. I'm moving way back. Right. Oh, sales pressure in that time. When I

Scott Scully:

tell you 500 People, well, what are you going to do if they can't park? Right? In a three

Jeff Winters:

year life raft and you were drowning? Would you take up? Yeah, okay, fine. No, I would, you know, I

Eric Watkins:

would Yeah, I think the important thing is like, be yourself because, like, people are all on this spectrum. And they're a little bit different. Like, for me, like if I were doing it, my goal would be to have such a connection with the person already where I'm like, Jeff, are you? Are you getting off this call? And you're gonna go talk to Scott, I'm never gonna, like, are you? I never like, but that's the like, be yourself. If that's your personality. Great. Do that. If you're more excited, be that, like, but don't be a robot.

Scott Scully:

But let me ask do you and Scott have shovels? Yeah. Because how are you gonna move the How

Eric Watkins:

are you gonna dig for growth gold if you don't have any shovels?

Jeff Winters:

And that was this week's tales from sales. Oh, my God, I love it days from

Scott Scully:

Eric. You know, I like this last section. And I think that in between Episode One and Episode Two, we we decided to affectionately call it to do

Eric Watkins:

or not to, to do or not to do that is the question. That is the question. The question straight from Shakespeare's lips. himself. He'd be so proud. Yes. So my topic today and I'm interested your opinions, holiday cards to do or not to do. And here's what I'll say. I'm not married yet. I don't have kids. I do have a dog. And some people like that, that that's something that people are doing. I think it's a little too early to be doing it before that. But excetera I get a lot of holiday cards. I don't look at a lot of holiday cards, I get them. You know, it's just kind of one of those things where you end up with 1520 And you're like, I don't where do I put these things? What do I do? But it's a nice touch, like up on the personal level. But from a business standpoint, it can be super impactful. But what do you think, Jeff? What do you think about holiday cards? What's your take here

Scott Scully:

for you might not get any based on your answers.

Jeff Winters:

I'm fine. receive them. I don't feel one way or the other. I don't. I come home, they're they're up on the board. It's wonderful. I'd love to see your family, your dogs, your kids your fun vacation you went on. I don't like doing them. Because it's a very stressful event in my house. You know, it's the most it's one of the most stressful days of the year. Is family picture day. family picture day. In my house is holiday card creation day also. So it's double, it's double trouble. And it's, you know, weeks in advance, I gotta, you know, soup cleanse and then and then after that we gotta go to work, you know, matching sweater Yeah, forest, it's 90 degrees, I got to pretend like it's December it's sunrise, you know, we gotta get the right angle, you know, and if to like five like this is they're not quite it's a very stressful note. So I don't, I don't like that part of it at all, period, so I am a not to do for myself. But kidding aside, I like seeing that like my friends, kids and that I don't talk to that often. That kind of thing. So

Scott Scully:

my kids that I've put through an assembly line of licking stamps and signing cards would say, not to do. But, you know, I think all kidding aside, if you're a business and you have important partners or customers, you should do this. It's a perfect opportunity to thank them for their business, acknowledge the partnership, let them know how much you care about them. Not everybody does it. So it's that just another thing that you could do to stand above the crowd. You've got people that are calling on your very important customers as we speak, trying to steal, steal them away from you. So you might as well love on him during the holidays. And just depending on how many customers you have, you got to find the right process to do this, that's for sure.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah. And it's like what doesn't make sense to me as you spend all this time, energy effort and stress on your personal holiday card that well, maybe maybe you all different, it doesn't generate me any revenue, the personal holiday card, it costs me and then you spend no time or thought or even think or even send out holiday cards to customers that you value it that that doesn't make any

Scott Scully:

I don't think that the picture matters, if I whether it was from one of our vendors, I guess, or partners or whether it was from somebody that I knew personally, I guess if they sent me a card, I think that I would feel acknowledged that's nice, maybe a little personal note, no form letters. I don't need to know that Johnny got three promotions last year and Sally's in her fourth year. You know, Texas Tech and you know a new little ones on the way a dog survived the you know, leg removal. And you know, you've been married for 12 and a half years. And you don't know

Eric Watkins:

how you can just go to Facebook these right? We don't

Scott Scully:

need form letters, that's

Jeff Winters:

for sure. What about the negative for like, tell me all the bad shit. That's gonna

Eric Watkins:

be a nice time. Yeah, definitely

Scott Scully:

actually a great new social media channel.

Jeff Winters:

You know, Billy suck because yeah, Billy's at TCU got suspended for the second semester.

Eric Watkins:

He's coming home. He's coming out with a lot more.

Jeff Winters:

Good news. You're gonna see a lot more villian. Scott son

Scott Scully:

was just tardy for the fifth. Things are great.

Eric Watkins:

They've actually moved class start time back. Right. So McEwen can make it on time.

Jeff Winters:

Steve, my son plays high school soccer. He had an own goal last week. big bummer for the family.

Scott Scully:

Mackenzie scored on the opposing team's goal again. Well, we love her.

Eric Watkins:

I think overall, it's hard to do. As a business, it's a for sure to do on the personal level. It's like yeah, to do i do like seeing them. I should say that I'd be like, I'm gonna I'm gonna backtrack a little bit. There's some.

Scott Scully:

It takes a lot of work. So you got to find the right process and but get them out the door if you're, if you're a business because you want to acknowledge your customers. another awesome episode of the growth show. We've got even more goodness coming your way in the weeks to come. As always, like, subscribe, share, do all those things. get the message out and give us some feedback. Let us know what you like. Let us know what other things you'd like us to talk about. Have a great week. Let's grow.

Jeff Winters:

Let's grow let's grow. The grow

Unknown:

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