The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Eliminate Negativity... Immediately

June 08, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins Season 2 Episode 26
Eliminate Negativity... Immediately
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
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The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Eliminate Negativity... Immediately
Jun 08, 2023 Season 2 Episode 26
Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins

Team members with negative attitudes are like a virus - it spreads quickly and can have a serious impact on your team's culture and morale. It's essential that you remain "stubborn" on not accepting negativity in your organization, and take steps to eliminate it immediately.

This can be especially difficult when you discover a high performer is being negative. But in the long run, it will be worth it. When you show your team that you are serious about eliminating negative behavior, they will appreciate it and work even harder. 


Thanks for listening!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Team members with negative attitudes are like a virus - it spreads quickly and can have a serious impact on your team's culture and morale. It's essential that you remain "stubborn" on not accepting negativity in your organization, and take steps to eliminate it immediately.

This can be especially difficult when you discover a high performer is being negative. But in the long run, it will be worth it. When you show your team that you are serious about eliminating negative behavior, they will appreciate it and work even harder. 


Thanks for listening!

Unknown:

All these years blood, sweat and tears. I'm still here. Sadly nothing could stop me. Welcome back to the gross show. My name is Scott Scott. I am here with Jeff winters and Eric Watkins. And hopefully we're being helpful in your journey to year over year predictable growth. That's why we're here.

Eric Watkins:

Hello, everybody. Welcome back.

Unknown:

You know, before we get started today, Eric just mentioned that, you know, speaking of growth, we've got a partner of ours that had something significant happened.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, so we have a client, noble building and development that had a recent deal. So this was a deal that we set for them back in 2021. So 2021, that's a long time ago. first initial appointment. From then they've nurtured this opportunity continued to build a relationship, we knew there was opportunity right now there's like our original proposal for like a $1.5 million project. What we've just recently found out is they just closed a $4.8 million deal. Wow. Boy, a million dollars, their sales goal for the year was $15 million. So just in this one deal, we wiped out a third of their sales goal for the year. Needless to say, they're probably going to be going over that this year.

Unknown:

Shout outs all about shout out to their commitment in staying with the process and nurturing that prospect not giving up on them, right. And, you know, three, three years pass a lot of people like this opportunities, debt. So congratulations to them and their commitment to stay on with it. That's a huge piece of business

Eric Watkins:

in the first meeting was something to the effect of, we're going to have some projects down the road, but nothing right now. And 99% of people would be like, nope, not an opportunity right now, lose touch with it, and they wouldn't have won that deal. They wouldn't have 5 million coming in.

Unknown:

You never know which one of the prospects that you're talking about one day, not could knock out a third of your sales goal, right? You keep with it. So that's an awesome story. As always, we're gonna kick it off with two truths and a lie.

Jeff Winters:

Two Truths and a Lie. Thank you for all your submissions. Thank you for tagging me in comments. We appreciate it. I'm here so you don't have to be making sure that you know what comments What posts on LinkedIn are true and which ones are lies. The first post today comes from chinmay Nima Chima Nima says, love this book on culture by x two Oh, 10x. Based on an extensive survey they did across startups, it's so interesting that we usually, we are usually obsessed about measuring all possible metrics. But most organizations don't measure culture. Once you know the area to improve, you can get creative and coming up with solutions to incentivize the desired behaviors. And I think his point here is, most people sort of don't measure or have metrics around culture, and you should be creative and fine to them. That's the truth.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, tough, super intangible thing, hard to put your hands on. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't try to make it as tangible as possible. And I think I think that's an absolute truth. And it's something we're striving to do and get better at every single day here. That's a true

Unknown:

truth. The ones that are easier to measure, but are absolutely directly aligned as productivity, client retention, lower turnover rate, those things are for sures. And if you're doing all things the same, but tweak certain things, you near culture, give credit to that area. You know, if you've got an uptick in, in customer retention, or you have lower turnover, you know, if most of the things that you're doing were normalized, but then all of a sudden, you've got some new things and culture Give, give kudos to the team or some of the activity that you're doing.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah. And resist the urge to say, culture contributes to that. But it's, it's really hard to draw a straight line from culture to measure it, measure it on some of those harder metrics or biases get measured,

Eric Watkins:

you know, our, our culture here, we're all about growth. And I think one easy way to look at is our culture working is not just our people moving up in our organization, but when they're leaving, are they getting better jobs? Yeah, like are they going to better opportunities? Because that means we're staying true to what our culture is, and that should be celebrated?

Unknown:

Absolutely. Truth.

Jeff Winters:

Another truth for Mark bra and there's the old saying, we all know it. If you can't say something nice, don't say it at all, but in business. Don't say it at all is not an option. Friends, you must stay at it. And this is something that we are intentional about. And everybody needs to be intentional about Mark says, If you can't say something nice, say it face to face. This is the old. Don't love Don't text, Crucial Conversations. If you can't say something nice, say it face to face. I love this one.

Eric Watkins:

That's good. I want to make this mandatory. Yeah, my goal is at some point that we have a no, no crucial conversations or bad feedback in writing all in person, or over the phone.

Unknown:

And if we were to be honest, we've all failed. Oh, yeah. Yeah, yeah, but total truth. For me that should be sit down face to face, eyeball to eyeball.

Jeff Winters:

And now we come to the lie. This is rough,

Unknown:

I'd still want you to. It's hard to read, be honest with names.

Eric Watkins:

Give us that full name, giving middle name, social security number,

Unknown:

you're giving recognition to the truth and you're just skipping over the people that should be in jail. You're kind of letting them off.

Jeff Winters:

This is a lie where I hope he's a competitor. That's that's the lie that this kind of thing is I hope he thinks this and he's competing with us. That's how I know it's that's like my litmus test for a lie. If you said it, and you're a competitor, would I be happy? And on this one, the answer is definitely yes. Outbound Sales is so freakin broken. At any given moment. 99% of your target market is not in a buying timeframe. Approximately 1% are in a buying timeframe, but output but outbound sales focuses on the 1% book meetings book demo schedule sales calls. A focus on the 1% means you're spending the volume of your time trying to get lucky. All the metrics on outbound sales, I believe he's referring to dials, meetings, all the things we hold dear. They're answering just one question. And that question is, how lucky were we? Instead, outbound sales should get a SME or subject matter expert involved and focused on being helpful and providing value entertain them? Teach them?

Unknown:

What's Matt? Do? I have no idea? You don't know what Matt does?

Jeff Winters:

No. Can look him after I read something like that. I'm done.

Unknown:

Man. It's close. Matt's not responsible for a growth number of any significance whatsoever, that's for sure. Alright, we're just getting lucky. I'm just gonna educate people so that they just come in droves. And, hey, pitch me. I'd love to talk to you. Because Wow, you sound smart. Nope.

Eric Watkins:

Here's what Matt's not wrong about 99% of people aren't looking for your service today. Yeah, that is right. And you should be communicating with them. That is right. What is wrong, is you you got to self discover, uncover the problem. And then you got to sell them on a lot of people don't know where their problem is currently. But you're not going to, like, Hey, I'm, I'm across the street, if you ever need me, just holler,

Unknown:

have an interesting comment here. Maybe it's a 90 degree turn or whatever. But if you're in a business, where 99% of the people aren't in the market for your product, get out of it, like get in where you have a product or a service where it's your job to educate them, and how it can make their life easier, and make their business more productive, or save them money or whatever it may be. But if it's that effing hardware, 99% of the people just aren't going to be in the market. Wow. And I know what you were saying, there's gonna be a lot of nose. But there, there could be a lot of nose because you're in something that's just that hard. Make it as easy as possible. And I do believe you should create content to set yourself up as the subject matter expert while we're doing this podcast on gross, right, we wouldn't be doing it if we didn't believe in that part of what he was saying. But there are going to be people that don't listen to this podcast, there are going to be people that aren't reading our blogs or watching our videos. And you have to have outbound effort. And a huge percentage of our sales come from people that didn't realize that they actually could partner with us and sleep a little easier and fix their pipeline. They just didn't realize it that we educated them by making those outbound dial efforts or email or whatever it may be.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, and I think that the 99% comment comes from like, let's take a service like it. Everybody has computers that are working and doing something today, maybe 1% Don't and they're trying to figure that out today, but inevitably I listen to our close business calls. Every month, I scan through our appointment calls where we close business. And you listen to these calls, and they're like, yeah, no, I'm really happy with my provider, but I'm happy to sit down with you and and see what you guys have. And then they end up closing the deal a month from now, because we uncovered something that they didn't know otherwise. But you got to ask for the meeting, you gotta sell, you can't just sit back and wait,

Jeff Winters:

here's what this comes down to, for me, outbound is not a substitute for inbound, right? It is a supplement, you're right, you got to get the 1% that's in the market. And not to say that you're gonna get all that with inbound, certainly outbound will get you some of that. But if somebody's in the market, they're searching. It almost always right, they're searching or they're doing something. Sure. It's a supplement supplement like by that, by that measure. That means every single cold email cold call LinkedIn outreach, social outreach, where you get an objection isn't the 99%. And you just lay down. And that's wrong.

Unknown:

Eric just mentioned an IT company, it's super competitive, a lot of them do the same thing. And that's why it's kind of hard to grow in that industry. I just get to harp on this all the time, figure out your differentiator, and to where you are feeling like I have to reach as many people as possible to let them know about this. One thing that I could do for them, like you're going to want to have outbound effort. If you're that passionate in fixing people's problems, right? You're not going to wait around for him to come to you. Yep. And if it's good enough, outbound efforts are worthwhile. If it's not, then it's not like if you're doing outbound efforts, and you're not getting an ROI out of it. You haven't figured out your differentiator, your product sucks, your service sucks, or you suck. So fix one of those. That was harsh, wasn't it?

Eric Watkins:

That was a little harsh. But sometimes,

Jeff Winters:

hey, if you don't have something nice to say, say it publicly on a podcast,

Unknown:

you know, we we would say it to him if he was here. He's in hiding. All right. Thank you, Jeff. As always, you're finding you're finding truth, and a little bit of a lie. We're at 50 for 50. Another big topic today. And I would like to know, how do you label this, be stubborn on not being okay, with negativity, like negativity in your organization is not an option. Eliminate negativity, immediately. There are a lot of open environments where people can hear someone being negative, held the the remote options, people actually talk about how having people more remote eliminates negativity, bullshit, it gives people more time to think about how they're going to communicate their negative feelings to someone else. And it's a little bit harder actually, to tell that they're doing it, but they're talking about it. They're slack in their email in their text, and they're doing whatever. And guess what, it could be a high performer, right? And then all of a sudden, you are like, well, I can't let that person have it. him or her. They're my top salesperson, or they're my top implementation person. And then you're handcuffed. And then yeah, they're doing a good job, individually, maybe outward facing but they are murdering your business. As we speak. You have to be so stubborn on this. You have to in your hiring process, say look, we you know, we have a lot of patience, we're here for you. We want to help you grow and develop. We'll work through problems. We'll we'll help you get through difficult times as long as you're putting the effort in. But I need you to know something. If you reach a point where you're negative in this environment, it's going to be a very swift you're out here. And that's hard to do, when sometimes it's even a good individual performer. But it is too hard to grow. It is too hard to build culture. It is too hard to maintain positive behavior in a world that isn't exactly helping people along in that area. God forbid they're watching the news or on social media. So we've always believed in this and and guess what? The people on your team when when you show that you are unwilling to put up with that kind of behavior. I think some of you are probably thinking, Oh, they're going to be upset because we let that person go. No, they're going to know Know that you had the balls to do it, and they're going to be happy, and they're going to work harder. In fact, I would suggest someone would take on more work in the interim, to get rid of that damn person. So I don't know what the hell that title of that would be. But get rid of negative people like right now, like when you're done listening to this and get back to your office, send them packing, and your organization will be better.

Eric Watkins:

I am so passionate about this, because I've seen it time and time again. So couple things that come to mind one, your your point on how people will feel when you get rid of the negative person, it's like the the air, the windows are opened up, and the breeze is coming in. It's entirely refreshed environment. And let me just give you the math behind this. So let's say you have a top performer in sales, that's selling $30,000. And you have they're on a team of eight people and the seven other people are selling $20,000 Your fear is like because this is where it's tough. It's tough when it's somebody who's performing well, but they're that negative and it doesn't happen all the time. But at certain points it does. That person getting rid of them, if they're bringing everybody else down 10 20% You will replace their sales with how well everybody else is doing. And that's the thing you gotta keep in mind. And I love personally when it comes to this is I love because you don't want to silence people like people should always have a voice You Always Want to Hear we talked about in a previous episode about problems. There's a Saving Private Ryan, a scene in there, where he's talking about griping up. And they're asking Tom Hanks about what do you think about this order we were given. He goes, I don't tell you what I think about this order we're given because I only talked to my commander, if I got a problem, you grabbed me, I gripe up, that's how it works. And if you are finding yourself even as an individual, it's going to suit you. If you get in the habit of if you have an issue, talk to somebody who can actually solve it. Don't complain laterally to your peers because it doesn't add benefit to anybody.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah, I want to pick up on this, I want to give you four ways to distinguish someone who is negative, versus someone who's trying to solve a problem based on something they see that could be better because that's those are two different people. We

Eric Watkins:

want different Yeah,

Jeff Winters:

we want the latter, we want people who are gonna say, Hey, I think this could be different. And here's how so here's the test. First is consistency. I'm a whole lot more likely to listen to somebody that brings me an issue one time versus somebody it's every week. The second. Are they just telling you? Are they telling others to Eric's point, people that are negative that are creating negativity around them? versus somebody who's saying something to you,

Eric Watkins:

everyone thinks I wanted to come to you everyone is talking about everyone's gonna quit you pull ever.

Jeff Winters:

Right? The third? Are they bringing a solution? There's a difference. If I'm complaining all the time versus bringing a solution forth, do other shutdown around them. If others if you're in meetings, and people are just like, forget it. I'm not gonna say it again. Because this person is so negative, I just want to get out of here. That's a little four part test to go. Okay. Do I have somebody here? Who's productive and trying to move the business forward and giving me critical feedback that I need? Or do I just have somebody who's negative? There? Are people rolling

Eric Watkins:

their eyes? That's good stuff. Yeah,

Unknown:

this might be a weird comment. But, you know, as you're growing the part of the comment, That's not weird, as you all realize that you got to put the best team together. But when putting the team together, do you take things into consideration? Like, who on my team is intuitive, like who has who can walk through a room and just tell that there is something going on over there in that corner? And that is not everybody. And some people are blessed and cursed with that. And some people are not they will walk through that room, they will not see it. So there's got to be different personality types on your leadership team. And there has to be somebody. And by the way, that somebody's probably going to annoy the others because they're going to say, I just walked through the sales pit what's wrong with Bob? Something's going on? And then okay, you said something was wrong. And, you know, implementations last week, well trust that person, because they probably are right, a lot of the time, there are people that can just read faces and just read a room and just know so something to take into consideration for sure. For be stubborn on this. You know, there's lots of different ways to attack this problem, but in its simplest form, analyze what's going on now. Take a look at your people. And keep your eyes open, be aware. And if there is somebody that is a problem, or a group of individuals that are a problem, address it but if it continues, eliminate it, cut it off as fast as you can,

Eric Watkins:

into that point. You just sparked something like where people make the mistake is they'll talk behind the scenes about this person over and over and over. And what's not fair to that person is oftentimes no one actually went and had the conversation with that individual, or put it in writing. So they knew the severity of how negative they're being. And that's, it's not fair to them, and it's just not productive as a business.

Unknown:

Good point. I'm not saying go walk over and fire him immediately. I'm saying, you know, it's kind of one, instead of three strikes, and you're out, it's a one strike, like, okay, Eric, here's what I noticed why. And then maybe learned something like, maybe it's a short term negative thing, and they're having an awful thing in their life going on. Or maybe it's a pattern. So there's a one one strike scenario that continues though it's eliminate. Okay, we're gonna head over to mining for growth. Cool.

Eric Watkins:

All right. So for today, we're going to talk about email. And we send millions of emails in all different departments. And we set 1000s of appointments via email. And everywhere you look, today, someone's telling you how to write an email what to say, what to do that's effective, I just wanted to give you our best five tips. Now there's a bunch of things that work, any email can work in the right situation. But this framework, if you follow this, you're going to be more successful, because when we analyze all of our results, these are the things that work number one, big subject lines, do not try to sell in the subject line and make it three words or less. Three words or less is just super common with every email we send out, that makes our emails that much more successful. Second thing, preview line cannot be an obvious pitch. And when I say preview line, what I'm looking at as the first eight to 10 words of the email that pops up, you guys probably know when you're in your inbox, and you see a little preview of the message, leave a little mystery, pique their interest a little bit, we're not trying to give away everything, all we want is the click, we want the click, so they look into the rest of the email. Third thing, 90 words or less period. If your product is super complicated, and you have to educate a little bit more, you can maybe creep to 120. But 90 Words or Less is what we're seeing in all of our successful emails. Number four, make it human. Easiest way to do this, is imagine that you're writing to one person instead of the masses, there's an easy trap to fall into when you sit down and write emails, of how is this email going to land with these 20,000 people that I'm going to send to, but 20,000 People aren't going to read it in a group setting. What is that one person going to be reading in that in that message where it feels like it came directly to them. And then the last thing is very the aggressiveness at the end of the email. So oftentimes, especially with in the spirit of driving leads, we're trying to set appointments, and every single email, and we have a call to action, or we have a call to interest and different strokes for different folks. Some people are direct, and they want to know what you're trying to do through the email. And they're not going to respond to Hey, tell me what you think about this. But some people aren't. Some people are more inquisitive and want to get into that. So very, a call to action, have a specific action to set an appointment. And very when you're just peaking interest. So something easy, these are five rules where you go write your next emails, you can plug them into chat, GBT. And you can make sure that you're following this. As you're writing your emails,

Jeff Winters:

let me talk about the call to interest because I think it brings about an even more important point. Email and Phone are not cousins, their brother and sister, your phone calls, if you're doing it right, ought to be connected to your email campaign and vice versa. And this is why the call to interest can be so impactful. If I say hey, you know, share with you my service, would you? Would it be imposed? Like, would you be interested to like learn more about this? Or would it be interesting to like, get a little more info and they reply, yes, boom, you're on the phone. Like that's, that's that that is why it's brother and sister. And that's why it's so important to make sure that all of your campaigns are multi channel in some way. And that some emails are designed to get a meeting and some emails are designed to drive a response to set a meeting through a phone call.

Eric Watkins:

That's a great point.

Unknown:

I don't know why I feel this weird need to say this. But there are not a lot of companies that are sending more email, daily, weekly, monthly, annually than we are and probably more important. We're doing it in every single state, small cities, large cities. So when you're bringing this advice, it's because it's you've seen it a Across 1000s of different campaigns, scaled industries. Yeah, that's a great point. Yeah, industry, small companies, large companies, and a lot of the advice that you see on LinkedIn or in other places, or people that are talking about email campaigns or call campaigns, and of things that they've seen at their company, right. And maybe they're doing a lot of it at their company. But I just think that the invest the best overall, they may have some good tips. But remember that we realize that you are in different markets, different sizes, different industries. And that's why we're trying to bring things that we've seen across the board that work. That's that's why we're doing this, I guess, because this is our business. So great advice. Again, Eric, thank you, Jeff, driving more leads means we got to be good at sales, what tips do you have,

Jeff Winters:

we got to be good at selling. And I'm going to give a tip for everybody, but also to some folks who are out there selling a little higher dollar product. Sometimes we skew a little SMB little small midsize business. So I'm going to give a tip here. And we often talk about finding out the decision making process who else is going to be involved in saying yay or nay to this decision. But there's a nuance here, and it's really important I want to share, there is a difference between the decision making process and the paper process. The decision making process is who's going to say yes, we want to go forward and buy this solution. Thumbs up the paper process is what happens with the agreement. And often when you're talking to prospects about the decision making process that's totally disconnected from the paper process. Let me give you an example. You're talking with your champion and the economic buyer, the person who can sign the check who's budgeted is who will ultimately sign the agreement. And they go yep, in terms of the decision making process, it's me, I make the final decision. Great, awesome. I'm going to send over the agreement, and we'll get going. And two months later you talk to that person and you go well, that's your were the final decision. Well, I do make the decision. But then it's got to go through legal. And it's got to go through compliance, in many cases. Now, some in increasing number of places, it's got to go through it. And lastly, it's a new rule. But it's got to go to the CFO. So now you're outside of the decision making process and you're into the paper process and you've missed and you've missed twice. First, you've totally whiffed on timing, because you thought and you forecasted this deal for X day not realizing this entire infrastructure had to be involved. And second, you've missed on getting those people involved earlier in the process. Because those aren't people who can say yes, that's a you've got you got people who can say no. And that's in many cases more dangerous. So the tip here is more for sales leaders, but also for salespeople for sales leaders, make sure you're asking your salespeople if they've identified the paper process, who touches the agreement? And who has to sign off? Who can say no. And then second, if you're finding this out, upfront, engage those people early. So you're it's not the first time they're seeing your paper, when it's time to sign the agreement, inspect the paper process.

Eric Watkins:

That's good. That's great feedback. And I think the CFO thing is interesting, I'm hearing that more and more and more, especially from our clients, that there's just, it's just has to go another level budgets a little bit tighter, people are looking at it. And we're actually in the process with the vendor right now. And they got our product team involved very early, which has been super helpful. And if they didn't, I could see how this would play out. We'd get to a certain point and be like, well, we can't do this. Like this doesn't work. And yeah, it's a big deal.

Jeff Winters:

We had an agreement not too long ago, Eric, where you were the quote unquote, decision maker, and you gave the thumbs up, and it got to the paper process, and we kicked it back.

Eric Watkins:

We kicked it back. Yeah. 100%

Jeff Winters:

had that vendor been involved with those at the other end of the paper process? Maybe they have a different outcome?

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, that's a great point. Great point. You're just

Scott Scully:

pinpointing again, an area in the overall sales process that people probably don't spend a lot of time. They don't develop in this area. It's like there's so much time on rebuttals or asking the right questions or shutting up and listening and from a salesmanship perspective, but that there's just things like this in the buying process now that I bet isn't in the training curriculum of a lot of sales organizations a really good

Eric Watkins:

point. I have a great example too, of like when you're when you're selling and then when you get those people involved. It's a different sale. So I was talking to one of our clients who's an insurance broker the other day, and he was talking to me about a scenario where he'll talk to HR representatives. And he'll have a clear way to save that company$400,000 in revenue on their premiums every single year, but it will cause 250 hours of work for the HR person and the HR person's like, I'm getting paid the same whether we do this or we don't. And it's just interesting how you have to frame that message to them of why it's going to be a benefit to them. And so, for example, the software clients when they have to get it involved, how are you framing it to it in a way where this isn't that one other thing they already don't have the time to do? Yeah, great point, Jeff.

Unknown:

It's another gym. I love it, Mr. Winters. So now we're there everybody's favorite section? To do? Or not to do that is the question.

Eric Watkins:

To do or not to do, and this isn't going to be a you doing or not doing for someone else this is going to be for somebody doing or not doing for you. The topic today is surprise parties. Oh, do you want someone throwing you a surprise party? Yes, or No,

Unknown:

I have two feelings. I do not want to be the center of attention. I'm kind of a shy person, I guess it would kind of matter to like if it's a smaller group, or like a bigger group, or

Eric Watkins:

at least 50 At least 50 people.

Unknown:

So I'd have two feelings. Like I don't want it. Like tonight really to be 100% about me. But then on the other side. I'd be like, all these people showed up. This feels really good that I have great friends like this. And the people that planned it really went out of their way to make sure that I was surprised I'd be torn. You know, I think the part that would win for me would be Wow, these people really did something cool for me. I had one on my 30th birthday. And I felt that way surprised and kind of awkward, but like oh wow, this this was really nice that they did it.

Jeff Winters:

I've had a couple surprise parties. They were like back to back years which I could live without, you know, because I don't need a surprise party twice. It's not a surprise if we do it every time but I'll say this in retrospect I love the back you're never like oh that surprise party sucked. Yeah, and the moment it's thanks, I unlike Scott, I do like being the center of attention. The more people the better strangers I don't give a shit but I'm telling you, in retro you got you got to live life for the moments, right? Because the moments have equity because you will relive them and reengage that happiness every time you relive those moments. So even for people that don't like surprise party, throw them surprise parties. I don't care if they hate it in the moment. You love it later. And that's that's what matters. Oh,

Unknown:

you just said something critical, though. Even for the ones that don't want I do feel like there are people out there that would hate you if you through

Eric Watkins:

certain people. But yeah. Anyway,

Jeff Winters:

you know what, let them hate you in the moment. They will love you late or in 10 years ago. You know what it was? Because people they go I hate surprise parties out to dinner.

Unknown:

How about this? Don't throw a surprise engagement party. Like, don't invite a bunch of people and say, surprise, and ask somebody to marry you in front of a group of people.

Eric Watkins:

They might say no, yeah, there's maybe certain things unless

Jeff Winters:

you're not sure in which case, definitely do it. Yeah,

Eric Watkins:

put a little pressure on it. But on the surprise thing, when you that you threw the president surprise you we had a company meeting and they disguised it. I hated every second of it when I was in it. But then looking back, there's always a little bit of you where you're like, that was really cool that they did that.

Unknown:

There's a surprise part. Yeah, I

Eric Watkins:

had I was saying when we when we were talking about this topic, I was like I haven't. I haven't had a surprise party. But yeah, that was one.

Jeff Winters:

What were they announced that you were the president company. Yeah. No kidding. That

Eric Watkins:

was a great brought my family in. Like whole deal. Yeah, it was great video. Yeah, videos.

Unknown:

Mom and dad talk and kind of making it been Danny been at my house.

Jeff Winters:

That's awesome. Yeah, it was cool. That is a great idea. See, it's all about what happens in retrospect. Nobody, nobody's I claim

Eric Watkins:

the moment. I was pissed. I was like, you're making me I'm sitting up on a chair on this day. I didn't like it. But good stuff. All right. Unanimous surprise parties. Do it. Do it.

Unknown:

What the hell go for it. All right. Again, a great episode. Good advice, guys. We hope that you are enjoying your journey. And we hope that this show is making it just a little bit it easier to have predictable growth that is why we're here always be growing let's grow let's grow the Grow show is sponsored by outbound SDR building predictable sales pipelines

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