The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Why SOPs Are The Recipe For Success

April 27, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins Season 2 Episode 20
Why SOPs Are The Recipe For Success
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
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The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Why SOPs Are The Recipe For Success
Apr 27, 2023 Season 2 Episode 20
Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins

Creating effective SOPs can be the difference between success and failure in a business. A great example of how SOPs can help ensure success is demonstrated through the case of Scott's mother's award winning lasagna recipe. Despite being an average cook himself, he is able to make this lasagna perfectly every time because there are exact step by step instructions that he can follow.

Thanks for listening!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Creating effective SOPs can be the difference between success and failure in a business. A great example of how SOPs can help ensure success is demonstrated through the case of Scott's mother's award winning lasagna recipe. Despite being an average cook himself, he is able to make this lasagna perfectly every time because there are exact step by step instructions that he can follow.

Thanks for listening!

Unknown:

All these years blood, sweat and tears. I'm still here. Sadly nothing could stop me.

Scott Scully:

Welcome back to the gross show. Business Growth stories from the frontlines. I'm here, as always. But Jeff winters, and Eric Watkins.

Jeff Winters:

Hello. Usually goes to you for us as Eric and then

Eric Watkins:

yeah, usually is the order right there somehow is mixed up, you can

Unknown:

mix it up and mix it up.

Jeff Winters:

It keeps me on my toes. Welcome back, everybody.

Eric Watkins:

Welcome back.

Scott Scully:

Thank you for listening. We've got unbelievable topics to talk about today. Before we jump into it, though, Eric, I heard we had a partner that is growing his business, they had something pretty spectacular. Yeah, sure. That sure. With us,

Eric Watkins:

I'd love to. So this is this is a crazy story, actually. So I was an account manager. You know, eight years ago, I've been at abstract 10 years. And one of my first accounts that I had, I had him for two, three years, MSP out of Salt Lake, really great client, we had a good relationship, I eventually got promoted, moved on, moved to a couple of different account managers. And then they got to the point where they closed had a lot of success with us. But they thought, you know, let's try to do this internally. So tried to do it internally, tried to outsource it. Long story short, didn't pan out, came back to us about a year and a half ago, we always love you know, when a client returns back, and they just closed a three year, 3 million, it's a $3 million total contract value, MSP opportunity, there's gonna be more projects and things on top of that. It's like 1000 Plus users. It's the biggest MSP deal I've ever seen. I've never seen one that,

Scott Scully:

that's so awesome. How cool for their business.

Eric Watkins:

That deal alone is going to grow their business this year by 17%. That 17%, they're gonna have to hire six people. It's like that we talked about the impact that our business has and the service we provide. And the ripple effect from that is

Jeff Winters:

ridiculous to things. That's why we do what we do, right? This business. But that's also why we do what we do here. Like we're not holding back anything that happened for that guy, to get that deal on this show. Like you're getting everything we did for that person here. That's why we're sharing

Scott Scully:

their 50 Plus person shops. So they're doing things the right way. And for several years, they've prioritized having a predictable pipeline, and, you know, have a guy leading sales and marketing and really prioritizing that. And it's working. They're growing their business. You never know when you're going to run into the $3 million deal. Sure. But they just did what a what a huge win for for that organization. You congratulations. Yes. So cool. All right, Jeff, I still just absolutely love that our audience has you as a resource.

Eric Watkins:

Calm in the past. little birdie told

Scott Scully:

me they're trying to figure out who you can talk to at LinkedIn to get that special icon next to special Sheriff hat hasn't happened yet. But

Jeff Winters:

you think they're talking about it? We're hoping high level, high level board level discussion,

Scott Scully:

Jeff is good at finding truths and lies.

Jeff Winters:

I find them so you don't have to. Welcome back to everyone's favorite segment. Two Truths,

Eric Watkins:

probably fourth favorite to true brother, fourth favor.

Jeff Winters:

Let's start with the truth. And I think it goes with what Eric just said, You should only focus on getting meetings with decision makers, that strategy is dead. Here's what the best cold emails and I'm sure cold callers on the planet are doing. They're reaching out not only to decision makers, but also to their direct reports or what you might call influencers. This is a truth. We speak around this topic. frequently. It can't be talked about frequently enough. There are too many products and services that our listeners are out there selling where they think they need to talk to the CFO, or the CEO. And you don't you don't you don't you don't need to talk to somebody who's influential in the buying process. We can't stress it enough. We talk around it, but this is a truth.

Eric Watkins:

So to add to that this deal that was close and I don't have the specifics in front of me but it was a director level very obscure title who we actually set the meeting with and that's what I saw got a board to present our solution. You know, it's so it's you try to tell these things, but you know, clients ultimately like want it to be As much like a referral as possible, I want to see level who's ready to sign and now, you know, but it's everybody, there's so many people involved in decisions today, you got to get in the business in different ways and leverage everybody and get champions, warm up

Unknown:

the influencers,

Jeff Winters:

a $3 million deal wasn't the economic buyer.

Unknown:

Good post,

Jeff Winters:

good post, our second truth. And this is, every team eventually devolves to the worst behavior that that leader tolerates 100% 100%, true church, you don't get what you expect. You get what you tolerate, agree, you have to hold people to high standards, and it's not some of the time, it's all the time. And if you start to tolerate, one person does this once, then they do it twice, and everybody sees it can happen, and everybody's doing it. As a leader, we're all guilty of this. Don't forget, you get what you tolerate truth,

Scott Scully:

everything that's going wrong in the world today, accountability. I know I'm a broken record on this. But you just because it's more difficult to hold people accountable to particular things, you just let things go. And then your organization's not tight. And results are not as good as they could be. I believe in this big time, you got to plan out, right? You got to really plan out what you actually care about documented, you know, put policies in place, and then live by those,

Eric Watkins:

it's so easy to break to, it's so easy to say this person's doing something over here. And maybe I can make an exception here. But that rip that trickle down effect. You make one exception over here. And what that does, it's like you gotta live by your standards, that

Jeff Winters:

dimension that was that came to us from Dr. Garland fans, not nothing,

Eric Watkins:

not nothing that matters.

Scott Scully:

You know, it's interesting to me, maybe you guys are gonna think I'm crazy for bringing this up. But most people have some sort of religious affiliation or spiritual belief. In any of those scenarios, there's some pretty hard and fast rules. Like, I don't know, if you're Catholic, X, Y, and Z. These are things that you believe in that you do that your practice shouldn't be that hard to understand when somebody goes to work. Right? Like they're just used to other scenarios in their lives, where this is the way we do it. Here's what we believe in. Here's how we're going to do it. And they do it. Right. Why? Why is it different? Why is it different when you go to work? Versus when you're in school? Or when you are at Mass? Or you're on a sports team? Why now when you go to work? Can you just question everything that everybody says and want to do it? Completely your way? Why? Why does that exist?

Unknown:

You get what you tolerate, get what you tolerate

Jeff Winters:

truth and now to to a person that definitely is not a doctor unless they got their PhD and LinkedIn lives. Mike says that outbound sales is about to go extinct. GPT four without any fine tuning or optimization can perform 95% plus of STRS entry level sellers and most early career AES people are saying i i am I've played with GPT for I've played with GPT it hadn't said a word to me so far for we're Oh for it talking to me. And at ease and this is outbound sales. Give me a break. You are always I'm sure all you

Eric Watkins:

I don't think any of these people actually own companies or run sales teams and if they do I would encourage them to fire the salespeople and hire a higher GPT and see if see what their sales looks like. Like there's no doubt that this will help. Yeah, be a huge part of it. But stinked though but you got to talk to people like

Jeff Winters:

I'm talking this is talking this is you know Brontosaurus pterodactyls extinction, we're not

Eric Watkins:

right. There's a there's a why?

Scott Scully:

Why I'm confused. Like, what is this guy think it's going to do?

Eric Watkins:

Talk to you sell you make your sign on the dotted line is that that's what you're saying? Right? Yeah.

Scott Scully:

So it's gonna write the content, publish it on the web. Do all the web site work that is necessary. It's going to dial the phone, send the emails, manage span I don't get I guess I just don't understand.

Jeff Winters:

I think the idea is completely disrespectful to salespeople. Well, and that's and I think that's a really good point. I mean, sales salespeople are in disrespect is not in short supply. And it's harder than ever. And no computer can do it. It's hard to find humans to do it really well. I hate this. To lie. To lie that makes me angry. It's a it's a different

Scott Scully:

well, and people are starting to believe it. Yeah, they're starting to, like, freak out and believe that this will actually run their lives and

Eric Watkins:

like, I want to see the AI sales team. And like what they sell. Right? Like, I want to see somebody, we we got rid of all of our sales. I just don't I don't believe that that's gonna happen.

Jeff Winters:

No, it's not gonna come on.

Scott Scully:

So I can't talk about this anymore. Let's go to 50 for 50

Eric Watkins:

for 50. What do we got today?

Scott Scully:

You know what I want to talk about the 50 for 50. I'm going to mix it up a little bit. I want to talk about my mom's lasagna.

Eric Watkins:

Oh, lasagna? Mom?

Jeff Winters:

Spaghetti. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

This is a challenge. I'm challenging all of you that are listening out there. I'm sure that there's some of you that think that you just are really good at making lasagna. So my challenge is, I think I can kick your ass in the lasagna world. What do you think of that? Mr. or Mrs. Lasagna that's out there thinking you have the best recipe.

Eric Watkins:

Someone out there? Thanks. I think they'd go at you.

Scott Scully:

Well, I think you know, by the end of the segment, that might be a good idea. We might have to have a little lasagna off.

Jeff Winters:

LinkedIn is gonna love that. Yeah, that's what we're giving them lasagna challenge. Post your recipe.

Scott Scully:

Yeah. So my mother. And it's not her original recipe. She got it from somewhere, but it's the one that she made growing up. She had so many comments about how wonderful this lasagna was. In fact, there's so many people that told her you should you should open up a restaurant, you should just make lasagna. It's that good. Well, I'm a bad cook. I am you guys just looking at me. Like I know, I've seen you. He makes fun of my grilling all the time. So I'm, I'm not, I'm not good. But you know what I can make lasagna I can make my mom's lasagna? Do you know why? Because there are exact step by step directions. And all I have to do is follow those directions. And then bam. I've got amazing lasagna. That is how I'm leading into strangers. It is standard operating procedures in your business. Because it's really that simple. If you believe in a process, like I believe in my mom's lasagna, if you think there is a way that you should implement clients, or there's a way that the phone should be answered, or there's a way that you build something, you know, it, it works. Is it documented? Do you have standard operating procedures, businesses that have documented SOPs perform at such a higher level? And this is work that we're always in the middle of. And it's so helpful. Like, how do you train the new person when it's just tribal knowledge? What do you do when somebody walks? And it was in their head? Right? How do you differentiate? How do you clarify how do you develop people? How do you maintain consistency? Yeah, I just went on the Anheuser Busch beer tour. Absolutely spectacular. If you haven't those of you that are listening, if you haven't gone go in everything. Like runs like a top. And the amount of beers that they bottle in an hour is ridiculous. And the formula is exactly the same. They can produce millions of bottles of beer, and have them all tastes the same. Shoot, shoot them all over the world and have them taste the same. And it has to do with their processes that are ironed out documented, followed religiously. Even the people giving the tours give the same tour over and over again. Same stops. They say the same things to have the same stories. And guess what, you have a great tour, right? Or guess what you taste a great beer. And your business is like this. If you have a service or a product, you have the document the standard operating procedures and you have to follow them To make life easier to be able to make good lasagna when you're a bad cook, think about that there you have a brand new person coming into your organization and you want them to be good at a task, like cooking lasagna? Well, what happens if they're step by step directions? You know, then they're gonna be that much closer to success, what success looks like for you. So weird way to back into SOPs, but you have to have them in your business, document them do videos, do audio, have, you know influencers, talk about your processes, all the different ways to really pound Home Depot, the exact way in which you want somebody to do what is right look like so that somebody can do that over and over again,

Eric Watkins:

I think what's important to reiterate is that this is a 50, for 50. This is for to get your business to $50 million, you can get to $10 million, and not have SOPs, and not have a repeatable process and not have something that scales. But you will not, you won't get to 50, never, you will not get to 50, without having in order to grow, you're gonna have to promote different individuals, they're going to have to move on, you're going to have to have somebody come in and replace them. And if they don't have that blueprint of what they need to do to be successful, you're not going to do it. You're just not going to scale at that level.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah, I think with this show, and for our listeners out there, you've got to have some points where you go, team, this is a what got us here won't get us there moment. This is that this is that. And it's hard. Because even if you're having success and thriving, what got you here won't get you there. And that's what we're trying to help you do, we're trying to help you take it to the next level. Because we know the zero to one, the one to five, the five to 10 attended, we know all the different phases of that journey times two, or three or four amongst this group. This is one of those phases that sneaks up on you snuck up on me, didn't know didn't know this was going to be a huge problem until it was because you you don't you don't feel this. This is one of those you don't feel any didn't show up in the numbers. There's no metric or KPI that goes up processes are lack of processes holding us back, you must know that this is something that you need. And you got to install it immediately before you even think you need to.

Scott Scully:

Can you imagine me trying to teach you how to make my mom's lasagna without the recipe? I could, let's say I've memorized it, right? I know it, then maybe you're watching me or we're doing it together. But

Eric Watkins:

I could see you guys cooking lasagna together, we

Scott Scully:

will do that. But that's not to say that after a couple of times of doing it together that somebody wouldn't pick it up. But how do you make sure it's repeatable? How do you make sure that it's the same way? Every time? The quality is exactly where you want it?

Jeff Winters:

How shady is that lasagna though? If you teach me and I show you a few times, and I even get kind of good. But then somebody who reports to somebody who reports to somebody who reports to me comes over and goes scouting and making some moves on you're not gonna believe it's called Scotts flop mom's was on you're like, Okay, I'm Scott, my mom that was on he's gonna taste totally different.

Scott Scully:

Yes, gotta have a documented, weird way to think about it. But when we did some training here internally, when we started talking about lasagna, all of a sudden heads were shaking, like, okay, I get it. You want something to turn out the same way every time from a meal perspective? So you follow the recipe? And then most people can actually do that. Why the hell wouldn't you do that in business. So that's the exercise is to look at all of your departments. Figure out what you don't want to be tribal knowledge, what you don't want to walk out the door what you believe in most, and make sure to document those processes so they don't go away. And then of course, in another one of the episodes, we talked about how important it is to run quality on those, as well as a KPI within every position in the building. All right, let's head over to mining for growth gold. Equity after

Eric Watkins:

all right mining for growth gold. Today, we're going to focus on social and give social a little love today. So a little bit of background on this primarily, what we suggest is to spend your advertising dollars when it comes to social on LinkedIn. The reason we've suggested this over the recent history is because you can separate by title, you can separate by industry, you can separate by business size, you can separate by function, it just gives you so much more of a targeted audience to give your message to and that's how it's been for a while and that's what we've encouraged, however, recently, with tools such as Clearbit, which we've adopted over the course of this year for our organization. Don't forget about Facebook and Instagram, because we have put a ton of focus On LinkedIn, but what we've realized now, with a tool like Clearbit, is we can now see who comes to our website, if they're in our database, if they're interacting with our post, we can use these demographics to be able to retarget these prospects on Facebook and Instagram, your dollars go a lot further than they do on LinkedIn. And we can reach such a wider audience with what we're going after. So we're actually seeing a lot of success, implementing on Facebook and Instagram, to take advantage of all those visitors to our website to take advantage of retargeting the people in our database. So so more than anything, this is just a reminder, because Twitter's you know, had some changes with how they're doing their advertising, and a lot of people are moving off Twitter. And it's putting that importance back on Facebook and Instagram. And I think, you know, this is your wake up call to hey, if you're not doing anything with those channels, it's probably time to figure out a way to leverage this,

Scott Scully:

you know, one thing that I would add there is I just think that their targeting has improved period, even if you don't use a tool like Clearbit, I've, I'm getting served up some pretty dead on messaging to me in my position, having never been to their website share, or you know, any other social channels. So, of course, they're going to figure that out when, when a lot of you know b2b advertising dollars are, you know, run away from the platforms and, and go to LinkedIn, of course, you know, you're at Facebook, you're going to or meta, you're going to figure out how to recapture some of those, those ad dollars. So they've figured out even more specific targeting. And then if you use the tool Eric's talking about you can hit people right between the eyes, and it's working. This has

Jeff Winters:

evolved a lot, we spent a ton of money, years ago on Facebook, and just burned it, we could have lit it on fire, it just, it was not even close. And just because the way we were doing it, you had to match business email addresses to whatever email address they had on Facebook. And often that was their personal address. It didn't work, they've clearly got it dialed in. It's not a surprise, the competition for the b2b advertising dollar has never been fiercer, because brands, big brands, especially are pulling back on their total ad spend due to economic headwinds for some seems like Facebook and Instagram have made a great investment. They're figuring this out. The targeting has been spot on. Great tip. Yeah.

Eric Watkins:

And the other thing to think about here is that decision makers are only getting younger, by the day, like the generation of decision makers, every single year gets a little bit younger and into a different generation. And all of those individuals grew up on Facebook, on Instagram. And so I do think there's going to be this period, maybe it takes a little bit of time, but those channels are going to become more and more effective.

Scott Scully:

One thing that's notable is that this advertising can be pretty inexpensive, right? So you can be pretty targeted on those platforms, and not have to spend a ton of money to end up getting a couple of good leads in a month. So I would encourage you if you're partnered up with somebody that's helping you with your marketing to explore putting some of the budget in those areas. And if of course, if you have any questions, give us a call. Thank you. Sir Jeff, what do we have tales from sales today,

Jeff Winters:

we recently did an episode on what to do at the end of the sales call, with agreements. And now we're going to do what I do at the beginning. So we're gonna give you we're gonna give you both ends. This is our 123 magic. It's not new, but it's no less magical. This is the upfront contract, as it were, what as a sales rep, you should do what a sales leaders we should be holding people accountable to do. And it's giving people the buckets that they're going to fall into at the end of your initial sales call or sales presentation. And I'm gonna tell you why you do it, share how you can do it. And then I'm going to share all the reasons why people are going to tell you, they don't want to do it. So first, why you do it at the end of sales calls, top reps can figure it out, they really can like some of your best reps can weave their way around the clothes and the next steps and they have the great questions and they have the perfect tone and I get that. But a thing leaders need to get out of the habit of is training the team like they are all your highest performing reps. They are not. So you have to train the team to the average or to the median. And this is one way to do that. So at the end of calls you have to solve for how do we make that easy, frictionless make it so we're not fumbling around so we're easily getting what is the prospect thinking without having to ask those questions fumble around or worst case not even know. And one way to do that. As by upfront, say, Hey, I'm really excited and energized to have this call. As far as an agenda, we're going to bump up up. And at the end of the call, you know, one of three things is going to happen. You know, sometimes we have folks, and this will all depend on you. Sometimes we have folks who say, Hey, I love this, I'm ready to get going right? Now, let's get moving. I want to grow my business. Great. Second, you might say, I really like this, I think it could be a good fit. I gotta have two meetings internally. Let's schedule some time to regroup and talk about next steps, okay? Or we might say, hey, this isn't a fit. You might say that, I might say that, and we can just part as friends. Does that sound, okay? Boom, now you have yourself set up for the end of the call. That's why you do it. That's how you do and here's what you're going to hear. I don't need that. I don't need to do that. That's old school. That's this. That's that. And here's what I'd say, for some of your top performing reps. Fine. I'm not messing with people with a x percent close rate. But for those that are not at that close, right, not at that production level, or for whom you're teaching, like that are new, do this,

Scott Scully:

I couldn't agree with it more. And it really sets you up for success at the end from a closing perspective. Because if you're doing the right things you haven't, you shouldn't have a lot of two's, right, because you like if you're doing the right things, as a salesperson, you should have all the influencers on the meeting with you. So as a sales coach, if you've got an enormous pile of tools, you can coach people away from that over time, it's like, look at what it looks like, we need to get more of the influencers involved in the initial presentation. And it's hard to like, I would suggest that it's hard to get to the you can get a three, but you shouldn't get the three at the end. Does that make sense? Like the way that we coach people is to ask questions on each slide, for instance. And if they don't agree that their life would be different, or that this would help to not even go to the next one until you get an agreement. So not say that you're not going to have somebody that doesn't want your services. But it should be pretty confusing. If you get to the end of an hour discussion, and you get a three, you should get that earlier on. If that makes sense.

Eric Watkins:

There's two parts of a call that are really hard for new reps. It's the opening. And it's the closing. And I think this takes care of both of them gives them clear direction on what to do. They don't have to get all awkward at the end of the call. You just figure out what bucket they fall in. And then you have your plays that you run from there. I think it's the easiest way to train new reps. A tenured rep wouldn't do it either. It makes it easy to be a buyer as well. And I think that's important in the sales process. I can be honest about where I stand because you've created an environment. I don't have to lie to you like oh, no, I really like it and follow up with you later. No, you've made it easy. It's okay for me to say no, I'm not interested.

Jeff Winters:

And most of the time, you don't get to the end of the Congo. Which book at Aria, like, that's not how that that works. They'll come right out with it. I think I'm in bucket two. I'm a bucket one. Or I'll say as the sales rep, they might not say their bucket three. But if I'm not getting much at the end of the call it sound like you sound like a bucket three, maybe this just isn't a good fit. That's how you use bucket three.

Scott Scully:

It's funny as a sales rep or as somebody that has spent a lot of time selling. I would maybe I wouldn't say it like that. Which bucket are you? But I actually would, I'd say Right, we're, we're to that point. I've really enjoyed the last 45 minutes. Now, this is where you tell me. Am I one? Yes. I absolutely want it. Am I Oh too. I like it. But I just there's a couple of things in the way of some questions I need to ask or just not right for me right now. It's just as an easier close. Closing can be awkward, but not if you told them exactly what you were going to do up front. Now you're on at the end. It's like okay, I'm here. We're here. One, two, or three. I guess

Jeff Winters:

my point is, in my experience, they come right out with it. Yeah. Yeah, a lot of them just say a on the bucket tournament bucket throw or whatever. Yeah, that's what ends up happening. It's good. It gives them an out because the price the buyer doesn't want to say the buyers, there's an infinite number of possibilities like you as a seller, it's like okay, here are the three things I'm really looking for. They don't know that if you don't tell them. So as a buyer, there's an infinite number of things they could be saying or thinking if you give them an edge, okay, I'm just I'm a one, I'm ready to roll, like, boom, they may not have even known that was possible. If that's the other. Sure. Yeah,

Scott Scully:

I think it should be required. Every new sales presentation that you guys are having out there as listeners, your salespeople should be able to come back and say they are a one, two or three.

Jeff Winters:

I will say our sales rep with the highest close rate on one side of our organization, by a longshot doesn't ever call religiously

Scott Scully:

and choose MIDI, who are the decision makers or what's standing in the way you know, that's the kind of thing More, you've got more plays, like I said, the maybe it's not in the I like it, but maybe I don't know how I'm gonna afford it bucket or I love it. But I don't know if my partner is going to love it. That so you got to have more plays into.

Eric Watkins:

But you get that answer like you get that information, which is key. Yeah.

Jeff Winters:

Speaking of important information

Eric Watkins:

most important, this is a good one today because this is this is getting out of control a little bit. It's like everywhere you turn these days now

Scott Scully:

there's another category that's getting out of control. So out of control.

Eric Watkins:

There's a lot of out of control categories. And honestly, I look for like, that's what I'm doing all week. Leading up to the podcast, all I'm doing is looking for what's getting out of control that we need to wrangle it. I might I might be the Sheriff of everything outside of LinkedIn. You'd like that climb key the horses, the horses. What I'm talking about today, is yard animals. I'm talking about those cement structures, you know, you got a little you got a lion, you got an eagle. You know, there's been some giraffes lately. It's like should you have some giraffes and animal in your yard? A fake animal? Right. And keep in mind, Jeff didn't know what a yard animal was when we brought this topic up earlier.

Jeff Winters:

So sure I quote Yeah,

Scott Scully:

he's not looking around. And he's not

Eric Watkins:

looking around enough. But should you have a yard animal? Or should you just decorate your yard in like a normal way without, like having to have a fake animal? Scott, let's start with you.

Scott Scully:

Well, no, no, you shouldn't have a yard animal. And I have noticed,

Eric Watkins:

we're gonna ruffle some feathers out there.

Scott Scully:

I've noticed three giraffes in the last week. You guys told me you thought I was lying. I'm not in the last week three drafts. So by the way, we should invite them on. There's a there's an unbelievable fake giraffe salesperson in St. Louis. They are unloading these fake giraffes. Like, we gotta go hire that person.

Eric Watkins:

They can't be cheap either.

Scott Scully:

No, no. And, and I think maybe you're thinking as you're listening, that there's a certain demographic that this goes with no in all three scenarios. The last one I saw was on a house that had about five acres. And this particular gentleman thought it'd be a great idea to put an enormous giraffe right next to his pond. How big is this thing at half half the size of a regular draft, which is huge. Shut up. So I am and maybe some of these are almost the same size as a female draft. And then I honestly don't know how to tell the difference between a male and a female draft but regardless, no, no, stop.

Eric Watkins:

Get a real giraffe. Jeff, what do you think

Jeff Winters:

this is all news to me. It reinforces what I've always believed which is I want to live in an apartment. Like home ownership. And I have no affection toward interest in appreciation of landscaping or yard anything. I just It totally is lost on me. I don't I don't need flowers. I don't need bouquets. I don't care if I have weeds. You don't like crash I don't need a rhinoceros or just front of my house. This makes no sense to me apartment living all the way if you're subleasing give me a call. I'm out.

Scott Scully:

Jeff is a candidate for a Ritz Carlton property he will be he will be retiring in a condo for sure. I don't

Jeff Winters:

need that. But if you're telling me I don't have to mess with my which I don't care about anyways. And like when my dishwashers broken I could just pick up the phone.

Eric Watkins:

You don't like having a yard though. You don't like walking out of your house and having a yard doesn't appeal to me whatsoever. Wow. Do you have any gnomes? I could see you being a gnome guy. Oh, no.

Jeff Winters:

No nomes to me.

Eric Watkins:

I really need to put this to bed. It was a great episode. put

Jeff Winters:

it to bed. Get up. No giraffes.

Scott Scully:

Those of you listening. Take your fake animal and I don't know put it in the fake animals Zoo. Actually, I'd respect you more if you had a whole zoo in the backyard.

Eric Watkins:

Actually, that'd be Yeah. Oh, thanks. Yeah, animal

Scott Scully:

Zoo. Anyway, we have really enjoyed putting this show together for you. Hopefully, take away a couple of nuggets. Be kind, grow and grow.

Eric Watkins:

Let's grow let's grow.

Unknown:

Let's grow. The gross show is sponsored by abstract talent solutions, recruiting for the modern world.

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