The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Season 2, Episode 4 - Rapid Growth Doesn’t Come Without a Business Growth Formula

January 06, 2023 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Season 2, Episode 4 - Rapid Growth Doesn’t Come Without a Business Growth Formula
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode we discuss the key elements needed to create your own growth formula, and how to measure progress so you can make any necessary adjustments. We also discuss why having a business growth formula is a must for any business looking to succeed.

Thanks for listening!

Scott Scully:

Hey, what's up grown nation? Welcome back to The Grow Show. My name is Scott Scully. I'm here with my co hosts, Jeff winters and Eric Watkins. Gentlemen, how are you? Hello. Hello,

Jeff Winters:

feeling good. Welcome

Eric Watkins:

back feeling good.

Scott Scully:

We are loving bringing the heat on just everything that you need to do on your journey from zero to 50 million in sales a little bit of what we've learned along the way. Some things we screwed up, some things that we absolutely without a doubt think that you should do. Bar-none. Just having a blast, sharing. Yeah, we are. We're gonna start like we always do. With Mr. Winters and two truths,

Eric Watkins:

Sheriff winters, that

Scott Scully:

is Sheriff Winters, keeping it clean,

Eric Watkins:

throw sand lie to troops, and you know, you've got some good ones, I

Jeff Winters:

think I got a good lie. But before I get into it, for our first time listeners, for our repeat listeners, for our loyal listeners, for our future loyal listeners, to truth and a lie segments and important segment, it's really for society as a whole, it's for the people. Because LinkedIn used to be a place Friends, let me take you back to when LinkedIn used to be a place where individual contributors, managers and leaders, CEOs and owners, and anyone who wanted could go to the platform, read the advice and take it as gold. And now, unfortunately, everything on that platform is not gold. And anyone can anytime, put out advice as though it is fact. And it is in fact, a lie. And so from this platform that used to be water from a spring, it has become the Mississippi River, water with a little schmutz. And we are here to de-schmutz. And make sure that you know what is fact. And what, Eric, is a lie. First, let us start with our two truths. The first comes from our friend Mark Plant, Mark Plant. It's an interesting topic here talked about really frequently. Mark Plant asks and then answers. How many founders should a start up business have? The answer then is there are no fixed and fast rules for this. But being a sole founder can be a very lonely place to be. It is not necessarily about the number of founders, but it always helps to have a founder as someone that they can talk to multiple founders, they can have someone they can talk to, that comes from Mark Plant, I really related to this, I think it's a as I've said, in past episodes of capital T truth. There's like this, like view of the universe that you got to have to, you got to have at least two co-founders, or you got to have two co-founders two is the right number two,two, two, two. And I think marks right I don't think there's any set number of founders that you need to have in a business, you could have a lot of different numbers. And so that's a truth number one. And then to the other truth, I'll say this not having any co-founders while not saying you should or shouldn't do it, is tough, having somebody else there to talk to to go through it with it's, it's a benefit. And it can be really lonely entrepreneurship can be really lonely. And having somebody else to go through it with as I think was a huge was a huge benefit for me. But I completely agree with our, with our friend Mark, there's there's no formula for how to do it whatsoever. Scott would say you I say truth.

Scott Scully:

I say truth. And you know, in my 30 years being involved in a few businesses, I will say that I have been in a spot where I have even started on my own but eventually brought others in. I think that you can be more powerful as a team. You find people that are good at different things, you know, to complement where you're not. I just think you have a stronger chance of success. I think a lot of single entrepreneurs still aren't single entrepreneurs. I think they've got investment. Right. And they probably have some money backing and and they're they're still part of a team, but it's just it's not the same team. It's a group of dictators, as opposed to a group that are in there. Maybe not taking pay, bouncing things off one another. solving the problems and celebrating when it happens. I get that you could say there isn't any particular exact number. I would say that more than one Is the round I would go

Eric Watkins:

yep. Yeah, being from the outside looking in, I would say there's just been different times. In our business with Scott, your brother at one point, and Brian and Jason were, you know, having the flexibility to go solve different problems with different people, you don't have that if you're just the sole, sole owner and operator of the business. And then I'll speak from the other side of, you know, growing into a spot where I earn shares in the company, I find myself looking at things differently, you care about the business in a certain way as that individual and having more people like that on your side, I could see over time how that's really valuable.

Jeff Winters:

In conclusion, through a lot of sales advice on LinkedIn, it's a great place for sales advice. There's some not so good sales advice, we may or may not get into some of that later in the season. But I think this is a good piece of sales advice. And it's simple. From my friend Alex Kraemer, your sales reps don't need another pipeline, or forecasting call. And this is near and dear to my heart, I have found a lot of leaders, especially sales leaders that don't get out of their office or get off their zooms or jump on calls need to have something to do. And what better to do, than to take up your day. And the days of all of your sales reps. With pipeline discussions, come on in, let's walk through your pipeline every day. Now, let's walk through it again, then let's walk through it in a group. And then let's have you talk to me about your pipeline in front of six other people and do it for three hours and waste a bunch of people's time when they could be doing the work that they ought to be doing, which is selling. So a lot of sales leaders think it is their duty to spend a ton of time in meetings, particularly listening to forecasts and pipeline and going through what's going to come in so they can report to their boss about what they think is going to come in. And it's a huge, not a small, an enormous waste of time, I understand you got to talk about pipeline, most of the time, these sales leaders are doing it so they can they can sound good to their boss. It's the exact opposite thing sales leaders should be doing. As we talked about in our last episode, sales leaders should be helping increase win rates to under 50%. By being on calls, I understand you got to know your pipeline. Don't wait your sales reps down. Your sales reps don't need another pipeline or forecasting call. They have plenty already. It's a truth.

Scott Scully:

Truth, most people are sitting on top of software that will give that manager everything they need to know anyway, right? The people have a job for a reason, I would have once a week. Well, here we have a map. But I'd have touch base with your salespeople individually, one on one, once a week. And then I'd let him sell the rest of the time. They know why they were hired. You should have their metrics up in lights in in whatever software package you're using. Let them roll, let them let them do what they do best connect with customers. And I do agree with like you said the managers stop calling meetings and because your people aren't doing what they're supposed to, that's probably a lot of it to they're not holding them accountable. They're not performing. So they're having another damn meeting, as opposed to just giving them expectations. Right. And then they have the job or they don't. And then like you said most impact, get on calls with them.

Eric Watkins:

awareness without action is nothing. So more awareness meetings is not the solution. You should have more action meetings or more action sessions of like, how do you actually move that pipeline forward? Because there's been this thing, I think there's been this trend in sales. And I would fall into this trap at times. It's like you glorify the forecast, forecast doesn't mean shit. Like, hitting the goal is what matters. The forecast doesn't mean anything. So I think the action that is taken is always going to take precedent over the awareness you get.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah, and everybody has a CRM or the vast majority of people have CRM, put the close probability in it. Right, the next steps in it, talk about it once a week. I've see a trend that I just despise, which is the forecast call where one person talks. The manager listens and the other four people on that call. wait for their turn. That cannot happen. Disaster, disaster waste of time everybody hates it. Yeah, well, they'll learn from each other. No, they won't. They'll play on the phones. Don't do it. Don't do it. Your sales reps don't need another forecasting call. Truth.

Eric Watkins:

Like truth Alex calm, good post Alex group posts with some

Scott Scully:

bringing the goodness to Alex is one of the good guests.

Jeff Winters:

And someone isn't some. This may be a frequent flyer on this particular segment. because it's sales development, which is code for spam, which is misaligned with buyer preferences, in fact, anti buyer and anti market modern marketing technology and know how from Nelson Nelson doesn't like sales development as a discipline, he thinks it's bad.

Scott Scully:

I don't even know that I understand. I don't really understand most,

Eric Watkins:

what is he saying? Nelson is saying you should never sell somebody something they should always buy it.

Jeff Winters:

Basically, I think what he's trying to say I don't want to speak for Nelson is that any outbound sales development is not okay. believe he wrote a book to this effect.

Scott Scully:

Nelson has a book, I believe so on why you should not have sales development, give or take, what should you do?

Eric Watkins:

Wait, wait, sit around and wait

Jeff Winters:

and wait. Right? I? This is rough. I mean, this is particularly hard for me.

Eric Watkins:

For all of us. It's what we do for a living well, a it's what

Jeff Winters:

we do for a living for 1000s of customers. But be we've also built businesses on this strategy. We have many friends, colleagues, and others who have built businesses on this

Scott Scully:

strategy author, or he as he actually had a business.

Jeff Winters:

I know he is an author. I don't know anything else about about Nelson I. He's spreading, but I think Nelson made may have maybe a like I said he may be a frequent flyer on the ships here is because this this works. Well, but I think this is serious. Like if people don't if people take this advice, and they go, this is right, let's stop, stop prospecting. Let's stop cold calling. Let's stop. You could put yourself in a world of hurt.

Eric Watkins:

So you're asked, here's what he is assuming? Yeah, right. I think this is the big flaw in the logic is that all potential buyers of your services are 100% aware of the problems and the impact that's having to their business right now. And they're not, they're just not. So it takes out bound prospecting, at times to educate and bring awareness to the problems that they're dealing with that if they fix could significantly impact their business for the positive. So sitting around and waiting, you are dependent upon the awareness of your future buyers, which I think is done,

Scott Scully:

Nelson apparently filed the yellow brick road to the end of the rainbow where there was a pot of gold. Nelson did too much LSD in college. And the fact of the matter is, you need sales development to land on the number of qualified meetings. And then you look at your close rate. By the way, we're about ready to get into the business development formula perfect lead in. But Nelson, you need some leads, and you can't sit around and wait or you won't grow. And you would know that if you actually did it,

Eric Watkins:

false lie.

Scott Scully:

I don't think many people are Brian Nelson. Yeah, like he might be out there, you

Eric Watkins:

get a lot of likes on that. You should share the number of likes No. Come on.

Jeff Winters:

It's good to have different points of view. Yeah, that is a lie.

Eric Watkins:

Are you pro Nelson?

Scott Scully:

Well, building on what Nelson said out there and LinkedIn, poop pasture. We would like to talk about the 50 for 50. And another one of our 50 strategies, tips processes is our business growth formula, not our business growth formula, but have a business growth formula. So we talk to lots of businesses that are looking to hire us and they want to grow. And we ask questions in our sales process. And a lot of people are not aware of the number of new sales meetings they actually need to have, in order to grow by the amount of revenue or by the percentage or number of clients that they want to grow by. So a lot of people say, hey, this year, I'd like to grow by 10%, or 20%. Or I'd like to double my business. That's typical, like we all want to take our business to the next level. But what is interesting is the amount of leaders that don't know the exact strategy that they need to follow in order to do that. And in order to know where you're going, you need to know, obviously, your current business as it stands today, right? What your attrition rate is going to be over the course of the next year. You need to know what your average client revenue looks like, what your close rate and your show rates look like. And you got to put the formula together, right? You have to know like too many people let's say it's a million dollar business, they say I want to do 1.5. So then they back in and they say okay, well if I put a half a million dollars in sales on the board, I'll be at one point Five, but they forget the fact that they're going to lose 200 grand that year. Right? They're gonna have 200 grand in nutrition. So they actually need 700 grand in new revenue. And from there, you got to back into how many meetings do I need to have? Like, how many appointments do I need to set to have X number of appointments show, you know, and looking at my close rate, and looking at what my average client looks like, like I need this exact amount of meetings on a weekly monthly basis, throughout the year to land on that new 700 G's in revenue. I know that this is it's like ABC 123. Like, why are they even talking about it. And the reason we're talking about it is because nobody does it, like nine out of 10, people don't know their actual formula. And the exact number of new sales meetings, they need to actually hit their growth goals. And I would also suggest some people don't even have exact growth goals. It's just, hey, it'd be nice to know. So like, you know, the most successful people in life, they have goals, very specific ones with strategies to get there. And they're living life with purpose on a daily basis, following those strategies, so that at the end of the year, they actually reached their goals. But somehow we don't do that in business. What exactly do you want to do? How are you going to get there? Foul it, there's a formula you need to put in place? You got to do it, or you're not going to grow period? What do you guys think?

Jeff Winters:

It's a very easy formula. Far too many people don't do it. And I think for those that that do, do it, here's at an executive level talking about the executive level, going through this formula, an issue that people will run into, is they stop at sales, they don't go back the next step. They go, Oh, well, okay, we know we want to grow 20%. And we're gonna have this much customer loss. And so we need this much in new sales. And then they hand it to the sales leader, and they go, let's, you got to figure this out. Here's, I think, our collective challenge, go one more step. If you are an executive, you're on the board, it is worth it to go that next step and say, Okay, we need this many shown pitches. And we need this many scheduled pitches. That's the challenge to the group. Because when you build from sales, it's not tactical enough, it's not enough in your control, build from meetings scheduled, start with meeting scheduled in the boardroom, you'll have an easier time getting the sales,

Scott Scully:

you're not going to grow year over year. Like in the beginning, you get you're so small, you get some referrals, just some things happen, where you may double from year one to year two without knowing this, right. But if you're multiple years in and you can't spit out, I need 532 News sales meetings to hit my 17 and a half percent growth goal. You're never gonna get there.

Eric Watkins:

You know, I grew up in this. So like, this was always something to me, like, Duh, right? Because I knew it from like, this is what we talked, we've talked about from day one. But then I talked to my some of my friends, you know, that do this at other businesses, not this but do things that other businesses, too, like? Yeah, man, I'm really trying to shoot for x this year. I'm like, oh, okay, well, how are you gonna get there? You know, I'm just really working on my pitch, and I'm gonna get a lot better. Like, well, hold on. You made me think about the numbers that are going to drive you to be able to get there. And you know, I think that and then the other side of this is yes, this is important to grow your business. But it's also important to pinpoint your problems. So like a lot of businesses, if you're just like revenues, revenue, and your group it all in, you don't know, if you have a churn issue. You don't know, if you have a lead issue, you don't know if you have a closed rate issue, but being scientific and intentional about it, you're just gonna be better as a business because you're gonna be able to isolate. Okay, here's the downfall in our process currently, and here's, you know, we need to we want to grow by 20%. Great, are we gonna get more leads? Are we going to close at a higher rate are we gonna lose, lose less customers, like what just one of those things has to happen?

Scott Scully:

Go down to at least pitches held, right. But, you know, obviously, the, the further you get into this, you're going to look at a referral, a pitch with a referral versus a pitch from a web lead versus a pitch from a cold call. And your show rates and close rates are going to be different. So you really want to get exact about this and be successful. You start at the top and then you continue, you know, as the years progress, working your way down, and looking at even more of these, these metrics underneath, but you have to have a formula

Eric Watkins:

that that's such a good point. Like you you have people who have just grown their business off referrals and then they come in and you know, they're, we're onboarding them to our services. And we're like, you know, what's your clothes, right? Well, it's about 90%. 90% Yeah, like, what kind of leads are you? Are you getting? Well, my buddy Frank is referring over all these people who have a need and pain. And it's a trusted source to a trusted source. So I think understanding every channel is going to have a little different clothes, right? It's not going to be what it's been

Jeff Winters:

to those people listening. Imagine if the one problem you and your executive team solved, to grow your business. Imagine the one problem you solved was pitches help. If you center your entire executive team on that, it's so hard to miss if you know exactly how many pitches you need, and you solve that problem, and you get that number of pitches. And you you can miss there's some obviously to Eric's point, you'll find whatever the real problem is, but boy, center your team on that number.

Scott Scully:

And you may find that where you're at today, it's like I need 532 new sales presentations to reach my growth goal, you may find that your without some serious movement, the growth that you want for next year, it just isn't even possible. Because you don't have aligned how you're going to get those new sales presentations. I would drill down on that number, like you're saying, Jeff, put it up on the wall, share it with everyone and monitored as the year goes on. And you're you're gonna have a higher likelihood of growing period.

Jeff Winters:

I know you had drilled down on that number, do you know how I know? Because we're on our 33rd meeting, it's it's October about how we're gonna hit the pitch. And part of this is funny and part of its real guy, I'm the Chief Revenue Officer, this business, Scott is my boss. That is what we meet about for hours and hours and hours and hours, how are we going to hit our 2023 pitch goal, we'll figure out all the rest of it later, we are not going to not hit that goal. And we're going to spend as much time as it takes to figure out exactly how we're gonna hit it. That's the level of rigor and discipline we have in this business.

Scott Scully:

Take it to the bank, find out how many new sales pitches you need for your growth next year, and let everybody know about it, share it, and and you will get there. Eric, speaking of leads,

Eric Watkins:

speaking of leads, we have a little bit of mining for gross gold that's been going on. And today, I am going to double your appointments via social with this tip, I'm going to double your appointments to x, you don't have to do anything different other than what I say in this tip. And I'm going to double the number of social opportunities that you get is a hot tip. So right now, you know this for the people that are doing something with social, they're getting some leads, right, you're running LinkedIn, you're running Facebook, depending on your b2b b2c, like you're running lead campaigns, you're getting lead, this even goes to website you're getting leads to your website, what is going on right now is you're you're working so hard to just get a response from a prospect, and then they're responding. And they're coming into your inbox. And then the person that was really good at writing that message is then now going back and forth, trying to get a meeting scheduled, and you are wasting time period, you are wasting time, what you need to do is either invest in a person that can do both, or find somebody that can pick up the phone and call this person ASAP. As soon as a lead comes back, as soon as they respond, pick up the phone and call them. Our conversion rates are off the charts from going straight to a call. And it's natural for us because that's how our business was built. So it's kind of easy. And I know that's tougher in different businesses, but find somebody who doesn't mind picking up the phone and call these prospects, because you will convert at such a higher rate, get a response, call them back ASAP, you can respond through LinkedIn as well. You can respond through email as well. But in addition, make that call right away.

Jeff Winters:

I think this is an very important evolution, probably for a lot of companies because it's so natural, like you send somebody a note on LinkedIn about potentially meeting talk about your services. And they reply, Oh, good. Well, let me reply. Okay, well, now I gotta wait for them to reply again. Why would you do that? I guess it sounds intellectually like, oh, this makes so much linear sense. Don't do it. Because as soon as you start this back and forth, now you're introducing time as this variable. They gotta be on the platform, or they gotta be in front of their inbox or whatever it is. Take time out. They've just they've just told you they're interested. Waste no time. Call them right then schedule that appointment.

Scott Scully:

This is not popular advice. No, not popular. People do not like to pick up the phone. The interesting thing is it's still the number one sales tool. There is. Period. End of story.

Jeff Winters:

we've coined a name here by the way. You have the cold call. It's been known forever. Eric, what is this?

Eric Watkins:

The warm call the warm call the warm call. The warm call And the here's the the hidden benefit with this too, you know, if you're a business like you, you don't want just one leads, you want to qualify your leads, especially ones that come through your website because you get a lot of junk. This gives you an easy opportunity to qualify the lead as well. And it's so much easier to do that over the phone than it is through a message. And it comes across so much better. But yeah, absolutely find somebody to take your warm calls as a business. And you need to come up with a system of how time is of the essence there.

Scott Scully:

Jeff, now let's assume that they've all listened to Eric's advice, why wouldn't they? And they are sitting there on a pot of gold leads. What do you got from sales.

Jeff Winters:

So what I'm going to say is, is not new. But the way I'm suggesting you do, it might be different. So for ever, and always, ever since sales theory became a thing, there has been this concept of the takeaway close or the reverse sell, which is the idea that you're going to kind of pull away from the prospect so that they will move toward you easy examples. And I don't recommend this language. But just for simplicity sake, easy example is you're getting toward the end of the call and the salesperson goes, Bob, clearly you're not interested in this. And then Bob goes, Wait a second, I am interested in this. That's the takeaway clothes in some form or fashion in a very simplistic way. And what I would suggest to our listeners, is that we need to use the takeaway close in a nuanced way, a lot more frequently, a lot more frequently. And here's here's the best analogy I can give at the end of a sales call. And I've listened to so many and so have we all it's like the sales reps are pushing on a pull door. That's what I feel they're pushing on a pull door, the prospect isn't given a much information. We've all been there. And they keep pushing them. Is this something you think you'd be interested in? Yeah, no, it sounds pretty entry. And then their type, and we're on Zoom now. So you could see him just doing, you know, looking up? And okay, well, well, why do you think you've mentioned this? Well, we, you know, gotta grow the business. And they're typing and maybe watching CNBC, and the, you know, in your head as a salesperson, they're lying to you. We're not interested. But you're just going to keep going for as a great show. We scheduled next steps. Yeah, for sure. Can we call it a couple of weeks? And you get off the call? And you go, I don't know. Seems like a winner, right? I probably I'll put it in my CRM give. What do you think? 50%? Let's give it a 50%.

Eric Watkins:

What what you hear is like, I killed that pitch or that yeah, like, I can't No rush. Yeah, well, what did they think that you did? Like, I know, you killed it. But what did they do?

Jeff Winters:

And then when you say, what did you think then you invent the story based on what you saw? Right? Well, you know, I can tell they're interested, because you know, they were engaged, and they're answering my question. Okay. You don't know that. So what I would suggest is, unless they're like, you're like, 90%. Sure they're there. You ought to use the takeaway clothes. And it ought to be it's so it's just gentle. It's it's more nuanced. It's, it's, Hey, look, Eric. Tell me if I'm misreading the room here. Sometimes my wife says I'm a little not so good awareness will tell me if I'm Miss reading the room. But kind of getting the sense that maybe you're not that interested in this. Or maybe this isn't what you were expecting, like, am I? Am I reading that wrong? Boom, just do that. It's not offensive. It's not in your faith, not sales tactic II. It's just, I'm being honest with what I'm hearing and what I am seeing, because that is what I truly believe. And then you will get what you need. And that person will stop watching CNBC. They will stop typing, they will look at you, and they will tell you exactly what you want to know. And any answer to that question is good. Hey, you know what, Jeff, you're right. I'm not that interested. Okay. Tell me. Why No, that's good. Or they'll say, You know what, Jeff, I'm working from home, I got the dog chasing the kid who's chasing the dog was chasing the other kid. I'm not that focused, but truly, I am interested. And you know, when you say to that, tell me why. Again, it's the same answer to the question like, Tell me Tell me a little more about that. Why? Why do you find this interesting? Either way, that's the way you go. The tip here, use the takeaway close a lot more often. It doesn't have to be harsh. It can be nuanced, and it can work for you.

Scott Scully:

I wish Brian cannon was sitting here because when I say this guy's name, he would totally agree. But there's a guy on our past. His name is Mike Panozzo. He owned a technology driven direct marketing company down in Daytona Beach, Florida. He was a partner of ours. And Scotty was brilliant. Their technology was unbelievable. The the print technology that he had way before its time, things they did in the call center that they had, the way that they mined data. It was all kind of out of this world early for its time. I'm, and he'd walk you around. And it just, it was impressive just in what it did. But he'd say things like, I don't know. I mean, I think this is pretty cool. Like you think Toyota dealers would like it, you know, and then it will just boom, boom, it's doing all these things. And it's like, you know, or I think it'd be a good for car dealers. But I know, you know, car dealers, like, if it did this and put someone's picture on here and put their exact, like payment that they're making and how much money they'd save and put it all on a mail piece. And every piece could be different, like literally meaning that someone's picture the car, they're driving their current payment, and what their new payment would be if that was on a mail piece. Would that be a good direct mail? campaign? I don't really know. But I think you'd hear no, you're like, that's awesome. He was incredible. And they did 100% of his sales that way. Like, I don't know, I gotta ask you some questions. You're the one you know, the car business. Like,

Jeff Winters:

I love this probably isn't a good ideas. No, it's a great idea. Oh,

Eric Watkins:

there's all sorts of amazing science behind this. I'm reading the book, again, like for the 10th time, but crucial conversations leadership book about how to have tough conversations, and they talk about how tentative language is so much more persuasive than commanding language interesting. So coming into things being a little bit unsure, and not so certain actually gets people to want to do it more. And I think with what we sell, we sell exclusivity. So you talk about you've just got you've talked about this a lot, is not only the takeaway close at the end, but don't ever give it to them in the first place. So a lot of times, you know, will we sell an exclusive market and be like, I think you'd be a great partner. Like we would love to have you we'd love to. But along the way, it's like, I don't maybe maybe it's you. Maybe it's somebody else. I'm not sure. Maybe you don't want it, maybe someone else has a better fit. That makes people want it more like they want it more. If you don't give it to him. So take it away from

Jeff Winters:

him. And it's not scummy. It's totally honest. It's like watching you're not paying, you're not paying attention. Like I genuinely want to know it. I genuinely don't think you're that into this. And like that's what I'm gonna say, you know, where else I would say that in life all the time. Like if someone it's just real life sales, by the way, spoiler alert. Sales is just a conversation between two mammals like it just like real life. It my wife and I are watching a movie and she's playing on her phone. I'm not gonna say Do you like the movie? Yeah, like the movie? And are you having a good time? Oh, man, it's such a good time. No, what I'm gonna say is, Hey, Kate. Seems like you're not that into this movie. Wrong.

Eric Watkins:

Am I wrong? You're not into this.

Jeff Winters:

Another tales from sales?

Eric Watkins:

I another tales from tales from sales. That was a great one you liked? That was a great one. No, that's the takeaway close is just you know, what's the root of it? What's funny is it goes back. Whoa, you're going back? We're coming back. We're

Jeff Winters:

coming back. This one. Really tales from set? Just really quick. You know, it's a good yeah,

Eric Watkins:

we we talked about this in a different and a different deal is pipeline meetings. I think we actually enable this behavior in pipeline meetings, because what we do is we create this culture where people want to constantly have deals in their pipeline. Yes. So the fear is, I don't want to lose a deal in my pipeline. So I'm not going to ask those uncomfortable tough questions, when I feel like they may not be a deal. So I feel like to bring it full circle. You guys are sharp today, like that. I like all right.

Scott Scully:

Now, you know, what this leads us into,

Eric Watkins:

you know what it leads us? To you, you got to do things, or you got to not do things, those are your only options to do or to not do and that is the question. So, if you're looking at me, like I got for us

Jeff Winters:

well, because you said it's to do what not to do. It's not to do or to not do.

Eric Watkins:

Is that what I said?

Jeff Winters:

Rolling over in his grave. Now. What are you talking about? I'm going to the I'm going to the monitor, I mean,

Eric Watkins:

to do or not to do? That is the question. That is the question. Is that the question? Okay, you ready for this? I think we're all aligned on this.

Scott Scully:

I think Shakespeare really would like how we're using this.

Eric Watkins:

I think Shakespeare would love how we're using this. The kind of language we're using on the gross show.

Jeff Winters:

Thou doth protest too much. Oh, my

Eric Watkins:

thou doth

Jeff Winters:

a little bit of a high level

Eric Watkins:

should thou should thou eat breakfast or not? You hear a lot of people out there that say breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It sets the foundation for the rest of your day. Scott, start us off. Are you a breakfast guy? Are you not a breakfast

Scott Scully:

guy? On Thursdays

Eric Watkins:

I eat bread on Thursdays you eat breakfast? So one day,

Scott Scully:

I think that it's been proven that it would be the meal that you should not skip. I have not been good. At this, I'll grab maybe a quick bowl of cereal but more often than not breakfast bar and an ICE T and head out the door. But I think if you ate a well balanced meal, you'd probably have more energy and eat less as the day goes on. You know, like for instance, you wouldn't be loaded up at dinner right before you went to bed. I know what Jeff's gonna that's

Jeff Winters:

a stock answer. Get that out of the closet. Um, I am very pro breakfast food and anti variant whatever the the anti underscore is the act of eating before 11 I just find it repulsive. I

Eric Watkins:

bet you can't wait till 12 Oh, no. We found that out. Dude,

Jeff Winters:

get out of my way. There's a line at the microwave. I'm be at the front of it. And by the end, I will gorge myself at 530 Forget Oh, you forget it. Like, dinner isn't on the table at 530 I'm just breathing hot fire on whoever I can look at. Let me tell you something about breakfast. Here's why. It's here's why no one should eat it. Number one. I have said all that energy bullshit is made by like the breakfast interest group. That's not true. It's a scam. I have so much more energy, not eating bread. i By the way, what time is right now? It's 1245 Central. I haven't had a morsel to eat today. I'm bouncing off the wall energy drinks. I'm bouncing off the walls. I couldn't have more I could run a marathon right now. If I had three eggs and four pins. I mean, I look at people with pity at breakfast at 830 when I'm having coffee and my kids are losing steam and they're having three pancakes. I can't even imagine that life. I don't know what that is. That's gonna have three pancakes. And then what are you gonna We're

Scott Scully:

not good. We're not good sources. He has energy drinks. I have Adderall. We are two bad sources for whether or not used to get energy in the morning from food.

Jeff Winters:

I'm looking at this guy and I'm little what does the rest of your day look like after two pieces of French toast at eight? I know what? Like I'm Oh, it's over for me. So I am a no breakfast guy because of the energy because of the focus. And as important as any of that stuff. Because the convenience because you know what? The Pro breakfast crowd does? You know what they're worried about? I haven't eaten breakfast yet. It's 915. And I haven't had my breakfast. Yeah. In that great. Like, don't worry about that. Don't worry. We're not in the hunter gatherer movement anymore. You don't need fucking breakfast like, just don't worry about it. It's so freeing to not have to worry about a third of the meals you're gonna have during the day

Scott Scully:

such bullshit. So if we had eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, whatever it is here. And if you were to walk in the door, walked by a breakfast bar where it was there. Would you skip past it? Or would you get yourself played because it was there and it was easy.

Jeff Winters:

I would only be there to look at the people who are going to have two big sausage patties at 730 in the morning and then go on about their day like It's unfathomable to me

Eric Watkins:

our production would drop at 10% We should do it. We should do that. We'll do a test. We'll give one team pancakes every single morning. I think it I think breakfast is a scam. It's unhealthy. Every every piece of it is that there's not one part of it that's healthy. There's not one part of it. It's all carbs. It's all sugar yet to

Scott Scully:

see somebody come back from lunch and not false.

Eric Watkins:

That's true. That gorging Well that's because they probably ate breakfast too.

Jeff Winters:

Because they smashed a couple of dishes at breakfast.

Scott Scully:

They did not eat breakfast and they smashed three burgers and want to Jeff salads at lunch

Eric Watkins:

so what a Jeff salads will put you out for the afternoon

Scott Scully:

that's bigger than this table it's bigger

Jeff Winters:

we can get into I think eating any protein before five o'clock should be outlawed. For productivity sake any discussion for another time?

Eric Watkins:

Okay, yeah, I don't disagree with that. But we're not anyways, I think to sum it up. Don't eat breakfast. Don't I don't care what your health teacher told you. Eat breakfast. Are you trying to grow your business don't eat breakfast and eat bread.

Scott Scully:

I would like to put a disclaimer out there that at least for the last couple of episodes. I do not agree with the advice that we're putting out there in the world. As always, we would like to remind you to be kind, grow and grind.

Jeff Winters:

Let's grow. Let's grow let's grow. The grow show is sponsored by inbound SDR digital search that works

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