The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines

Episode 22: The Power of Employee Recognition

September 16, 2022 Scott Scully, Jeff Winters, Eric Watkins Season 1 Episode 22
The Grow Show: Business Growth Stories from the Frontlines
Episode 22: The Power of Employee Recognition
Show Notes Transcript

"The Great Resignation" has forced companies to take a harder look at their employee retention. One simple way to motivate and meet the needs of your team is to ensure you are regularly recognizing their efforts. We discuss how to correlate employee behavior to the company mission, making sure even forced recognition is genuine, and all the different ways we praise our team members.

Thanks for listening!

Eric Watkins:

Welcome to the grove show where we make it easier for entrepreneurs and leaders to grow their businesses. You'll hear from real leaders with real stories about their successes and failures. So you don't have to make the same mistakes. We won't break out textbooks or talk theory, only raw stories from the front lines with actionable takeaways. Welcome back to The Grove show. I'm here with my partners in growth today, Scott scoli. Hello, Jeff winters,

Jeff Winters:

everybody. Well, gentlemen,

Eric Watkins:

it's good to be back in the saddle here. You know, it's been a little bit since we've recorded one today, we have a fun topic that we're going to talk about. But before we get into that, our very own Scott played at the number one golf course in the state of Utah Scott, how did the golf round or,

Scott Scully:

you know, hit him a long way as the altitude helped. Not gonna lie when I did not hit it into the rocks.

Eric Watkins:

Did you use the rocks? Did you get some?

Scott Scully:

You know, it's funny that you say that a couple of times during the round or three of us playing. There was some rock aided

Eric Watkins:

golf. wrong with that?

Scott Scully:

Totally. Out of bounds. It like a part of a mountain bounces right back in. So there was that, but most of the time it stayed out.

Eric Watkins:

Hey, better to be lucky than good.

Scott Scully:

Beautiful course though.

Jeff Winters:

Yeah. golfer in the state of Utah play the number one course in the state. Yeah. What could be better?

Eric Watkins:

Would you shoot to keep track?

Scott Scully:

6868

Jeff Winters:

Good luck. Get

Eric Watkins:

him on the Live Tour. Get him on the left.

Scott Scully:

That's what I would shoot on. Nine. Maybe?

Eric Watkins:

Jeff? How was your weekend?

Jeff Winters:

Fine. I do want to say your little

Eric Watkins:

episode, didn't you?

Jeff Winters:

I love food poisoning. Food boys. Scary.

Eric Watkins:

What got you what you don't have to say the place? Was the food that you

Jeff Winters:

ate I

Eric Watkins:

chili dogs had chili cheese fries.

Jeff Winters:

This is not a great look for me. I had a large order of I did not

Eric Watkins:

for the record. Is it worse than when you said you ate six out though I had a large

Jeff Winters:

I had a large order again adult size order fettuccine alfredo and an adult size order of linguini. carbonara and the same meal for yourself. Yeah,

Scott Scully:

where the soup go.

Jeff Winters:

I you know the soup

Eric Watkins:

all week. So you can eat two orders of pasta.

Jeff Winters:

But you're here are there? And can I can I just say for those watching on the internet and those listening at home, we're in a slightly new area of the studio, which is so much more comfortable. We're buried in this cord out or

Eric Watkins:

kind of stretch out a little bit. We're in the corner. We're not, we're coming out in the open. And you know what? I feel like people are appreciating us more, don't you all feel that way to feel a little bit more appreciated. And that actually brings me to our topic today, which is the power in feeling appreciated through the power of acknowledgement. You know, one thing that we've really discovered and our years in business is that there's really no substitute to making sure you're acknowledging people about the things that they're doing right and the power that that can have throughout your entire organization. Jeff, why don't you start us off today, talk a little bit about why acknowledgement is so important for individuals in your company.

Jeff Winters:

So we'll spend 40 minutes talking about why recognition is so important and so powerful. I want to kick it off with this, though. I think that oftentimes in organizations, recognition is a huge afterthought. And something that because the leaders of the organization don't really need that the company doesn't as a whole do it. And I was kind of the I was like this for a long time. And what we found, you know, this was 10 years ago, we started the business, we started this little thing called an appreciation meeting. And every week, people go around and recognize someone else for something else they did well, the entire face and the culture of the business changed. You could just see and there are lots of different ways to do it. I'm just I'm just providing an example off the top of this episode of the power that recognition can have in this small example of the small company. And we did it every week and every week somebody wreck you recognize somebody else in that business. You said something positive about him. And it completely changed the culture of the business. It changed the way people interacted it changed the way people cared about each other. It's the small thing that's totally free that you can do inside your business that has tons tons of positive consequences, not the least of which in this particular example, for 10 years, literally, it just, it made the whole place gel. And it's had a profound impact on me in my life. And in the business and everybody that's worked there, I couldn't be more passionate about the importance of recognition.

Eric Watkins:

Scott, one, one thing you did, and this was over COVID, right, where our company wasn't used to being remote. And we all went remote. And you know, we're kind of in this new world, everyone doesn't know what's, what the future holds. And you had the idea of creating this thing called the success channel or a player accolades. And it was a way that we highlighted different individuals in the company. Talk a little bit about, you know, why did you create this? And what, like, how did you keep it going? And why was this so important to our business? Well, there's

Scott Scully:

a certain amount of feel good that you get when you're together, right? When you're sitting there side by side, you know, if something happens, that's good, or, you know, people pat each other on the back, say, Nice job, it's just, it's just easier to have that happen organically. When everybody was separated, and you're not sitting there together, it was harder to notice the winds. And so we wanted to put a channel together to celebrate when people were individual people were doing great things, or when our clients were having certain successes. And we put some business rules behind that. And it really took off. I think everybody wants to know that the work that they're doing is important. I think that people, although a lot of people say they don't need it. I think if we were all to be honest, with ourselves, we all like to hear that we're doing a good job. I think the most important thing that it does, if you are acknowledging somebody, I think that they bring their walls down. And they're much more open to coaching on improvement, and growth.

Eric Watkins:

Yeah, and I think what I loved about that is in the beginning, you know, we put business rules in place, and we said, you know, every manager needs to make one post a week, which is not a lot. There's tons of great things happening all the time. But every week, you need to go in and recognize one person. And what happened the first week, three people did it. The next week, four people did it. And you know, we got the pushback of this is an organic or, you know, we should just let this happen. And you understood like you saw the importance of it, you were like, No, we we need to do this, every manager needs to do this. And then fast forward two and a half years later, I don't know how many things from two and a half years that we're doing the same way now. But this thing is taken off, people are posting in it every single day. And I think it's important that a lot of companies like want this to be organic and fresh. And I think that's important. But ultimately, what you want to do is just create a culture of people recognizing others. And sometimes you have to get it going first, like you have to build some momentum for it.

Scott Scully:

Yeah. And we did say, hey, we don't care who it is. Right? Right. We just need you to recognize something going well for one person on your team over the course of the entire week. So there could be. And there are people that are doing even more than what we initially said was required. But once people got used to doing it, once we kicked it off and had business rules to start, then people started to understand how they could move their team and how that acknowledgement was really lighting people up and making them want to do the job more because they understood the importance. They saw the impact on our clients. Gosh, I mean, it impacted our sales team, because our sales team could easily go look at what was happening for our clients have on the spot success stories and feel better about getting on the phone and selling, you know, the products and services that we offer. That was big, that was huge. You know, it got a little bit easier to know who might get that next promotion because it just some of the same people just kept coming up over and over and over again, it was just clear of the work that they were doing and the impact that they were having for our clients. So it shed light on that. But I just think you just want to know that this work is we do hard things here. And when people get to hear about how we appreciate the work that they're doing, and when you show them the direct impact they're having on clients. I think it's a big reason why we've been able to grow and do the things we've done over the last couple of years. Well we grew during COVID If we weren't from our homes acknowledging the the hard work that a lot of people were doing, we may have been in a completely different scenario during that time period for sure.

Jeff Winters:

I want to pick up on a really important point that Scott made. And I think it's particularly important for newer leaders. When you give people when you recognize people, it can bring the walls down so that you can provide coaching. And the research suggests there should be somewhere anywhere between three to five points of praise or recognition for every one point of constructive criticism or opportunity. And it's, it's so easy to help and coach and give people opportunities for growth, that's easy. Because that's easy. That's what you're trained to do. That's what we're trained to do. Like a lot of us did those jobs, we're not coaching people who do the jobs we used to do. People aren't doing as well as they could like, they're structures in place, there's forcing functions to make sure that you're coaching people. But you have to force yourself and it shouldn't be this way, it should be easier to give praise than it is to give coaching, it's it's not because you don't remember, like the coaching is so ingrained in us as leaders and managers, you must and I had a tick chart for a while, Scott, I know you had different devices that you used, make sure you're given three to five points of recognition or positive praise, for every one piece of coaching or constructive criticism. If you do this, and you commit to it, you won't be sorry, people will respond to you so much better in those moments of coaching, I

Eric Watkins:

think that's a great point. And, you know, I would love to say that every piece of coaching, before I give it, I give three to five pieces of praise, and I'm not always the best at it. But think about what works for yourself. Right? Like I would love you know, I whenever i Whenever Scott, you say Eric, that was a hell of a job on this, that you can give me 10 pieces of coaching after that, that'll that'll carry me along way. Like it has a big impact. He's still never said that to me. But I could imagine what it would be like when he when he does, never, I, I think the the word that comes to mind is momentum. And I would, if I had to give a suggestion out there it would be to use the word and instead of but, so a lot of times what we do, what I do, I'm sure others do as well is, Hey, you did a great job on this thing. But if you did this, it would have just been a little bit better. And if you if you picture it, like you're, you know, you're building a house, so to speak, as soon as I say, but I just wiped down whatever house I built. But if you use and it's like, Hey, you did an incredible job on this pitch. And just imagine if you would have added this one thing on I'm now building, I'm creating momentum. And for a person who's struggling, especially, it creates this, you know, inertia to move forward, and it makes it seem more possible. And more and you know, if, when it comes to mindset, if you believe you can do it, you're gonna end up doing it. So how can you make things you know, using praise, to make people take that coaching and feel like things are gonna get easier because of it.

Scott Scully:

You know, there's, there's, we had the side where we were recognizing individuals, but just as important is highlighting what's going on with the clients, right for us, people believing in the service that we offer is huge. And we just, we weren't at the level of highlighting the really good work and the impact on the clients. We just weren't doing enough of that until we started this. And I truly believe that more people in our organization organization understand just how much impact we're having on individual businesses

Eric Watkins:

in the US. You know, what's crazy, is there's, there's so many, every role in the organization impacts the client in some way, shape, or form and us doing this, you know, I had somebody who wrote content for an email, come up and stop me and say, Hey, did you see that piece of content I wrote, you know, the client that I write for just closed a million dollar deal, and it was from an email point. And it's like that, that would have never happened if that in a lot of businesses, you're back into the house operational team isn't even aware of what's going on with your clients. And the fact that we make this global and spread to our whole company is really powerful.

Scott Scully:

Like if you own MSP right, and IT services company and you were attacked, that had X number of clients and all of a sudden cybersecurity software design that you put in a particular business stopped a breach or a threat, right? How good somebody might feel about what it would look like if they didn't do that and you can just If you can acknowledge people through the client success, and then when you can do them both together, it's even more powerful.

Jeff Winters:

One thing I found super interesting and probably tactical for listeners that I've really latched on to, that's been embedded into this business that I think is a cool best practice is that people are recognized annually, quarterly, monthly, weekly, and daily through a different set of mechanisms. So there is a quarterly vision meeting, where Scott, the CEO, recognizes people publicly, there are monthly kickoff meetings and monthly company meetings, where people are recognized both in their division and publicly in front of the company. There are weekly expectations of managers to be recognizing people within their areas. And then there are daily sort of ad hoc spontaneous recognitions of people inside of Slack channels, and maps, and maps to think about that maps being our one on ones. So think about that, you know, just tactically if you're if you're if you're out there listening, like okay, what do I do? Do I give somebody an employee parking spot? Do I call somebody out of the blue? Like, no, like, You got to be deliberate, like we set up these structures in place on this exact calendar rotation very deliberately, to make sure that people are truly feeling recognized and appreciated and publicly appreciated. And I can tell you sky you could probably echo this, I'm sure And Eric, you as well. We have these monthly meetings where myself and Eric and others will get up and sort of recognize people individually. There's not one that goes by I don't get a text. Hey, thanks. I watched that I really appreciate it shows my mom showed it to my my, my spouse, my partner. How are you figuring that out on a more of a deliberate calendar rotation?

Scott Scully:

Yeah. And so you say deliberate calendar rotation. And Eric, you'd mentioned that people said at the start, it wasn't organic. Why is it have to be like it's the right thing to do. And if you're designing your management, infrastructure, there are so many things that we put in manager job descriptions that they have to do or ways in what like, you think Chick fil A doesn't have a way that you greet someone in the drive thru? That's not organic? If you can do it the same damn time ever? Like what are cheerleaders for? Like cheerleaders aren't there to pump up the crowd? What are the big nowt now everybody's got a necklace or a belt, when it tackles made or a big hit happens or interception? What are those things for? Like, you know, there's not a business rule that when somebody makes an interception, the guy runs off the field and you put a big gold chain around their neck, that that's not like a rule that's not organic. They made the necklace they said for every interception, they're going to get this and does a person feel good? Hell yeah, they feel good. They're like looking for that big chain. Once they got the turnover. Like we've there's been cheerleaders for ever, what the hell's a marching band all about? What's there's just so many things that by design are to celebrate what's going on or to pump up a crowd. So what's wrong with putting business rules in place to make sure that you're acknowledging hard work, the person that is doing the acknowledgment is still doing it in their way, they're still picking the people to acknowledge. You're just saying part of your job should be that you recognize good work and celebrate client success. So stop if people are telling you to not put rules in place and to have it happen 100% organically, I'd say bullshit. Put your rules in place make it happen, because it'll work for you.

Jeff Winters:

I know you would say bullshit to that. And do you know how I know that? Because I didn't like this it to meet you said bullshit. So I this is important point. This is gonna be like a little hot. Take you a little counterintuitive. And I did disagree. And I think I was fucking wrong. So I know I was Scott. Grown up, have you? Yeah, no. All right, here's the deal. We in every one on one in this business, force, or expect or whatever it is, like you got to report all my people who report to me they have to report that they recognized at least one person per week. And I remember Scott said this and I was like, Oh, shit, this is gonna come off so hokey and shitty. Like, we're forcing people to recognize others. Like, that's the beauty of recognition is that it's genuine. But there's a difference between being genuine. And, like being, like, disingenuous, both, when it's expected that you can I, yeah, everybody has to do it, which is important, otherwise they won't do it or they'll forget to do it or it'll be backburner. But if you do it, even if it's forced, so long as it's genuine, that's what it matters. Yeah, right. It's gotta

Scott Scully:

be real. Like it's it is a job well done. You know, it is somebody that standing out from the crowd at is a client success. But that should, you should be able to make that a business rule. And just, if someone knows that a manager supposed to acknowledge one person a week, I still was the person that got acknowledged over the others. And I got a personalized message from my manager that meant something about the work that I do what the hell was wrong with that? Nothing, it should, it should happen, it should do it,

Eric Watkins:

but you make it right. It's what you make it and, and one of the things that we talked about earlier in the show is impact, right and impact to our clients. And people want to know that the work they're doing is important. So I think it's important when you say you set up, you listen to this podcast, and you're like, you know what, we need to set something up, we're going to have a regular format of how we recognize our people, in that you should talk to them and coach them on how to recognize people. Because if you say, oh, Jimmy did a great job last Tuesday, I don't have any context to how Jimmy did a great job. So coaching your team on how to relate what Jimmy did, and then what that led to and what the ultimate impact to the client was. And then what the ultimate impact from that client to the community was in how Jimmy did that, like getting the context? Well, we didn't even think about that this has turned into is it's coaching for our people. It's coach, not only is it good stories for our for our prospective clients, but a lot of our people get to see, okay, what are the I'm new here? What are the people that are doing a really good job doing? And how are they doing that? And I think that's been a huge part of this as well.

Scott Scully:

You know, you know, what is also impactful? Probably more impactful is the skip level, right? It's like if Jeff acknowledges somebody that doesn't report to him, that's on the front lines doing great work. It's like, wow, I don't usually get to talk to Jeff and Jeff noticed that I set X number of appointments or wrote this great content that that goes so far.

Eric Watkins:

Well tell them your story.

Scott Scully:

There were there was a period of time, a number of years back where, where I complimented one of the STRS that was on the phone about work they were doing. He tells his mom, who is then like, so he reaches out to his mom via text, his mom is sitting next to, you know, a financial partner of ours at a seminar, she tells him, and then that person texts me back, this happens like all within an hour. So I acknowledged the person, the person tells his mom who happens to be sitting next to a friend of mine financial partner, who then texts me, and tells me, like, how much it meant to this guy that that I acknowledged them for the work that was done just like that circle

Eric Watkins:

in. And here's the like, let me bring that full circle. Every one of our employees goes home, at the end of the day, maybe they have a friend, maybe they have a significant other. And what what do you typically ask, how was your day? And what do people most days they say, Oh, my day sucked. It was long. I hate my job. This was terrible. But when you acknowledge someone, what are they saying? They're saying, You know what, Jeff came by and actually recognized me for the good job I was doing, I got shouted out for my manager. And just that just builds a culture of just buy in to the work that we're doing and the company as a whole.

Jeff Winters:

It only does so though. If the recognition is good, yeah. And it and I'm gonna get real and give some tips on how it can be good. There's some so that you can text mom, because you don't want to text mom. Hey, Scott, CEO reached out he said, Nice work. The following demo, nice work and helped me. So very important when you recognize someone to do it the right way. Here. Here's some here's some tips and interesting brothers thing. One, gotta be specific. The more specific the better. You say nice work at that and helped me. You say, Hey, I was on the third floor yesterday. 305 I heard you want to call I sat there. I listened for seven minutes. It was incredible. I thought you brought amazing tone. I thought you were enthusiastic. If I were a client, I'd want you as my account manager. It was awesome. It's got to be specific to timely Hey, I gotta tell you I've been meaning to tell you two years ago I heard you want to call it was really good. It's like what are you talking about? Like tell me is like as soon as you hear it in your head out your mouth. Last I'm good with giving compliments privately make it public. People I'm a big love language got you all know this. I love the love language, the book the love languages. You know the book The Love Language.

Scott Scully:

You're kidding me? Right? You don't like this? I do. But I can't believe you're saying why this is important. What's your love language,

Jeff Winters:

words of affirmation. A lot of people's love language is words of affirmation. If you say nice shit about me in public, I will find you that makes me feel good, specific, timely public. Don't forget words of affirmation very, and I love language and also the love language of many,

Scott Scully:

I want to add to that, that's very, very good list. Nice job. Tying it in together, I love that.

Eric Watkins:

Katie's got said nice job. Didn't feel good.

Scott Scully:

It wasn't real wasn't see.

Jeff Winters:

Put my hand on my shoulder, my new love language.

Scott Scully:

Two things. One, we're trying to live by a certain set of values. So part of our acknowledgement processes, you know, we're trying to acknowledge people, while using, you know, one of these value words like, you know, countability, or awareness or attitude. So if there's any way that you could wrap your values, and when doing that, to show that people are living by the values and doing good things, I think that'd be awesome. And then the other thing, I do agree that a mix of public acknowledgement is great. But I would suggest that people do different things as well, like, go kneel down and Pat somebody on the back, send them an email, stand up in front of people do it publicly, write a card, stop by with a Coke, if they you know, you know that they love Coke or monster and just say, you know, put it in front of them and just say, wow, you know, and tell your story. Like he just did you know what I was just standing, I heard you on the phone, doing your whole thing. I know you love Monster, set it right down next to him. So like mixing up how you do it, as well, I think can be pretty powerful.

Eric Watkins:

I think that's important. And I think the other thing I would add there is just the mediums that you use, right? So if I communicate with my team through Microsoft Teams, or through Outlook, I might shoot them a text might leave them a sticky note, I'm gonna go walk over and say something in person, just whatever, whatever method of communication, you use the most use something different to give acknowledgement, it's just gonna stand out more. The other thing is that it has to be true, I'm gonna find something they're doing good. And I can call them out for that. But what I don't want to do is send a false message to the person that I'm actually shouting out. Or I send a shout out to somebody, you know, who's maybe underperforming or not doing things the right way, then what message does that send to everybody else on their team? It's like, why is so and so and the person's probably like, I don't even know why I'm getting recognized. So I think it's, you can always find something, everybody is doing something right. Pick the right thing. Make sure it's true. Don't just do it to do it and pick something random.

Jeff Winters:

I got a question. What do you guys think about the LinkedIn shout out, you know, on LinkedIn now, you can kudos to Bob for whatever and like an airplane flies across a rainbow which flies across the sky.

Scott Scully:

I think it's noise on LinkedIn.

Jeff Winters:

Do not recommend.

Scott Scully:

I don't like it I under I like the thought that, hey, I'm gonna try to get the message out in front of even more people, all of this person's connections, maybe that they've done a good job at you know, maybe it's because most of them I've seen aren't done well. Yes, probably

Unknown:

is how you do it. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

If you were out there, and you said, I want to acknowledge you know, Katie, for the last several years of kicking ass and, you know, she's now earned her way to the marketing department where she's put together this gross show. And you know, we're now all of a sudden having people asking us on their, their shows, and it's really taking the world by storm. You should listen to it. And a big portion of it is because of our producer, Katie, then

Eric Watkins:

Katie is our podcast host over here. She was really blushing. she's blushing then. We're seeing the power of acknowledgement

Scott Scully:

then that then that well that's true more compliment than it's true.

Jeff Winters:

Scott go around the table. Yeah.

Scott Scully:

Yeah, so may I honestly I take a take it back. If it's specific and it's good and it would make them feel good in front of their connections.

Eric Watkins:

Quick topic real quick. We have recognizing and then I think, you know, it's adjacent, but I do think it's a little different is celebrating. And what we do here is well, is we set up our celebrations ahead of time for our groups throughout the organization. It's a way of recognizing their hard work. But I think, you know, the the unexpected acknowledgement is awesome. I think it's probably the most powerful, but don't underestimate, you know, based on us hitting x, we're gonna go do this and having them involved in what they're gonna do. I mean, I think it's just been not that that's revolutionary, but I think it's fair to mention. You look skeptical, Jeff.

Jeff Winters:

Wow, just trying to make heads or tails of this difference between recognition and celebration, it seems like celebration is a subset of recognition. Yeah, right. Pretty close. Yeah. Pretty close. No, it's good.

Scott Scully:

I think there should be a

Jeff Winters:

really good kind of should be a Katy note that that's a really important MIB social share there.

Scott Scully:

There should be an award, I think for for each department. A lot of times that's held specifically to sales departments, salesperson of the month. But there isn't any reason why there shouldn't be copywriter of the month or videographer of the month or account manager of the month. And you can do that in a lot of different ways. Rewards points, plaques, trophies, gear, but it shouldn't just be for salespeople. And there, you're in essence, you're picking the MVP, if you will, for for the month. And I think that's just another part of all of this that people should consider. We've got several awards that are recognized on a monthly basis in our meeting. That's a great point. We're about oh, about that for the top players in each department. So I wouldn't skip that.

Jeff Winters:

No. So let me let me talk about something that some companies do. Some companies don't, that, that that we do that I have come to find to be a huge deal. It's like the intersection of recognition and celebration. And that is President's Club, a lot of thought, a lot of strategy, a lot of being deliberate, it's typically reserved for sales. Scott, you this, this company has spent a lot of time and money and thought and people talk about it. Can you share some thoughts on President's Club?

Scott Scully:

Well, again, it's it's an award strip that a lot of times is just something that sales teams do. But we have sales, account management, our fulfillment, sales managers, directors, just people that are performing at high levels, didn't get to go to Mexico for three days and celebrate how hard they've worked. They just get to take their significant other and we set it up in the in the onset, there was like four of us that went on never forget, we did our celebration and a bench, outside of you know, one of the all you can eat restaurants talking about what it would be like one day when there was 100 people on the trip. And sure enough, you know, we've we've passed that now. But I gotta tell you, the the people that went initially have gotten every year, they didn't, they didn't want to miss. And it's very rare when somebody earns their way to this trip that they miss, because when they get there, it's so much fun. There's so much recognition about the good job that they're doing. It's just, it's been a while sometimes people care more about getting to President's Club than they do like extra bonuses or pay or,

Eric Watkins:

yeah, because you're with a group, you're with all your friends that you work with all throughout the year. And you all work so hard to get there. And it's just top homeowners, you want

Scott Scully:

to be in the group, you want to be recognized as one of the top performers and that that trip helps us do that helps us put the best of the best all in one area and Ben, and gives us an opportunity for three days straight to acknowledge them in front of their significant others. And that's big, big time.

Jeff Winters:

I just think it's so neat. You know, again, most presidents clubs are reserved for purely sales. This isn't. And it is like the in the calendar of recognition. This is the annual recognition. And it's a big expense. It's a big investment. And I think especially now in a world of virtual, what better way to recognize a job well done to ensure that there's public visibility into those that are succeeding in all parts of the company, then to have this annual recognition trip. I think it's super powerful, especially now. In the world we live in.

Scott Scully:

Yeah, and it's it's hard when you're putting the budget together to think About if we're to be honest. But each time we think about whether or not we want to keep the trip going, you know, we always come back to the we have to, you have to gotta be there people are fighting for it, they want to be there. And it would be a significant loss if it wasn't there. And it's just, it's amazing. It's amazing to see people when they come back from that trip and how fired up they are, and the extra effort that they're going through to close out the year to get there, it's just just so much impact.

Eric Watkins:

I would say the last, the last thing that we didn't hit on, you know, you've gone through the weekly, the monthly, quarterly annual, the daily, the small wins. You know, one thing we have here, is we have roles within our organization, and one of our roles is actually celebrations called the chief celebrations officer. And it's important that in all the departments, you know, in the fulfillment division, when you set an appointment, celebrate it, you know, that's a pretty easy event to celebrate. But I could see how things like that in different organizations go on celebrated. So, you know, what are some Jeff, what are some things you guys all celebrate on a regular basis that you probably take for granted that really help create energy throughout your group.

Jeff Winters:

Um, I always think when it comes to this stuff, it's the physicians sort of that are behind the scenes. And so immediately, I spring to HR, and wrecks being filled. Or I spring to accounting and I think of collections. It's the little stuff like that, that you'd never celebrate unless you had somebody who was thinking about it and deliberate about it and conscious of it. Like those people need to be recognized just as much as salespeople.

Scott Scully:

Business doesn't run without cash yet, you probably aren't acknowledging the person that's collecting.

Jeff Winters:

And that job's not that much fun, generally, on balance, but that's the stuff you got to really force yourself to recognize as it as a team as a division as an entity.

Eric Watkins:

It's the gas that feeds the engine and just, you know, like, I think at the end of the day, just looking at it from Do you want your business to perform better? I think recognition is the gas that feeds the engine. It's it's one gets the people going and working harder.

Scott Scully:

Yeah, without without it. The car's not running. Yeah, for sure. I love that.

Eric Watkins:

We talked about the Corvette now you got to put the gas in, gets the people going see what I did there. That's a call back to call. Call that a call back. Note that, Katie? All right. Well, great conversation today, guys. You know, hopefully everybody listening has some good takeaways of how to recognize their people. We'll be back next week. Always be growing. Always be growing.

Scott Scully:

Always be acknowledging, always be.

Eric Watkins:

Thanks for listening to the gross show. Leave us a review and let us know how we're doing or if there's a topic you'd like us to cover in the future.

Unknown:

The gross show sponsored by Reggie are your outbound sales campaigns not driving the engagement you're looking for. Revenue leaders rely on reggie.ai to write high performing sales copy that cuts through the noise and books more meetings. Want to see how it works. Head over to reggie.ai/growth show and learn how to put the power of best practices in AI into the hands of your sales team.